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Goodbye June & Badflower @ Flycatcher

Stateside & The Rialto Theatre Present

Goodbye June & Badflower @ Flycatcher

Badflower, Juju Fontaine

Jun 02 Fri

Doors: 8:00 pm / Show: 8:30 pm

The Flycatcher

$10.00

This event is 21 and over

Goodbye June
Goodbye June
Straight up rock & roll isn’t dead, it’s just returned to the fringes and outskirts where it can find its organic roots all over again. Goodbye June understands all that: cousins who came together to cope with the death of lead guitarist Tyler Baker’s brother. That thrash, slash, churn, burn rages through grief as their catharsis fuels every note they play.

Passion is something there’s no shortage of with Goodbye June. Raised in West Tennessee and Southern Indiana, the cousins made a decision to chase a dream – and proceed no matter the cost. If not reckless, the reality of struggling to get by gives the lacerating, guitar-driven music a grittiness that’s nothing short of broken glass.

Having moved to a pre-gentrified Nashville in 2009, the threesome dug in and started slugging it out. Focusing on writing songs, mastering their instruments and really stripping away the sludgy build-up so many bands think is important, they hit upon the essence of their uniquely aggressive sound.

They played out. They toured incessantly. They placed hard-hitting songs on Madden 17, as well as NFL and ESPN broadcasts. With the EP Danger in the Morning, their focus was strengthened and their indie label Cotton Valley Music found a partner in Interscope.  Goodbye June realized their strength lay in stripping down.

God, girls, guitars. What’s a poor boy to do – as the Stones once barked – but play in a rock & roll band? For Goodbye June, it’s more than that. More than the catharsis of losing close family, the band has figured out how to distill being young and wide open to life – and how to connect to their roots without straining
Badflower
Badflower
A predatory catcaller. A tortured, addicted lover. A jaded, blue-collar bar band singer. A cold-blooded killer. With characters like these, you may feel as though you're watching a film, not listening to a rock 'n' roll record. These are just some of the compelling characters from the debut EP from L.A.'s Badflower, a fledgling rock band of cinematic proportions. The EP's songs showcase an exciting young group of musicians and a star talent in frontman Josh Katz. Long fascinated with movie music, his dark lyrics reveal a storyteller sophisticated beyond his 24 years. "I enjoy putting myself in other people's shoes, and imagining their thoughts, expressing those hidden terrors and fears," explains Katz about the roleplaying nature of his lyric-writing. "By acting them out, I try to stress how wrong these attitudes can be, but still show how easy they are to adopt." Badflower's songs play like short-films, with Katz portraying the various characters. Some are sympathetic, and some are monsters. These moral contradictions create a tension supported and reinforced by the music beneath. As his chief collaborator, lead guitarist Joey Morrow is responsible for much of Badflower's signature sound: snaky, psychedelic guitar riffs, often building to powerful rock rhythms over the course of a song. Bassist Alex Espirtu and drummer Anthony Sonetti provide a strong backbone, and Katz's tenor regularly turns on a dime from world-weary clarity to a violent snarl. Despite the intricacies, this is music for large rooms and big crowds – a throwback to the days when rock music could reach the wide masses, shake up the status quo, even save souls. "I'd like to change the world," says Katz. "I still believe rock 'n' roll has the potential to do that. We are committed to building this into a mountain, a skyscraper. We've all pushed each other to get better." With their debut EP, Badflower seems up to the challenge.
Juju Fontaine