Parkway Drive - REVERENCE North American Tour 2018

Phenomenon Concerts & The Rialto Theatre Present

Parkway Drive - REVERENCE North American Tour 2018

August Burns Red, The Devil Wears Prada, Polaris

Sep 22 Sat

Doors: 6:00 pm / Show: 7:00 pm

The Rialto Theatre

$35 - $37

This event is all ages

WWW.PARKWAYDRIVEROCK.COM

 

General Admission

Parkway Drive
Parkway Drive
A five- piece from Byron Bay. 2005 full-length debut, “Killing With A Smile” spent time in the ARIA National Top 40.

In 2007, PARKWAY DRIVE unleashed their sophomore effort, “Horizons”. Recorded once again by producer and Killswitch Engage guitarist Adam Dutkiewicz at Zing Studios in MA, USA, Horizons debuted at 6 on the ARIA chart, 1 on the Australian Artist chart and 1 on the Independent chart.

In 2009 the band released PARKWAY DRIVE: “The DVD” a 70 minute documentary. Featuring archival footage dating right back to their very first shows. Within a week of release, "The DVD" was certified Gold.
August Burns Red
August Burns Red
There are a galaxy's worth of metal bands active today. But stare at all of those stars long enough and some lines start to form; everything starts to take shape. The Constellations begin to bloom.

Just two years ago, Lancaster, PA's August Burns Red were, to the naked eye, just another young band jockeying for position in the modern metal scene. Then came Messengers, the band's 2007 full-length release for Solid State Records, and a new frontrunner emerged. Without hype, devoid of any smoke and mirrors, the album debuted at 81 on the Billboard charts, going on to ever-so-quietly sell more than 80,000 copies. Fueled only by the honesty and dynamism of the music, fans multiplied exponentially, driving ABR's MySpace plays well past the 17 million mark and flocking to the band's 2008 headlining tour – which included sold-out venues across the country.

Meanwhile, August Burns Red kept their heads down, conquering fans at Warped Tour, on the Take Action tour and at destinations from Dubai to Dallas, and increased their profile through placement of their beloved take on "Carol of the Bells" on the movie trailer for "The Spirit." The band also packed up their Phillies T-shirts and ever-present flip-flops and headed overseas for a tour of 12 countries throughout the UK and Europe. The star was shining bright. "It's extremely encouraging to see your band growing," says guitarist and primary songwriter JB Brubaker with characteristic modesty. "It helps keep you motivated and forces you to set the bar higher so that you can continue to grow and put out the best music you're capable of writing."

To that end – the band returned to the studio this past February to record its hotly anticipated follow-up with lauded producer Jason Suecof (Sevendust, All That Remains, Trivium). Fans flocked to the band's in-studio Stickam site by the tens of thousands to observe the band recording the album in real time. The result was Constellations, the third full-length offering from August Burns Red, set for release on July 14. A crushing metal tour de force, the album pushes ABR's trademark aural blitz into directions previously unexplored by the band. "We spread our creative wings a bit on Constellations," says JB. "But I can say for sure that this record will definitely be as unrelenting as our previous ones." Accenting the blistering guitar work and syncopated breakdowns that August Burns Red fans have grown to love are dynamics previously unexplored by the band. Constellations features more diverse tempos and cohesive song compositions than on previous ABR records, as well as the band's maiden voyage to the land of guitar solos.

"We've managed to push ourselves as musicians, as lyricists and performers," says drummer Matt Greiner. "As a whole, I feel like we're expanding, reinterpreting and refining our sound." That kind of sonic wanderlust has pushed August Burns Red since the members first united in 2003 while still in high school. Armed with fearless innovation, uncanny technical ability and an innate near-classical songwriting style, the band started turning heads immediately upon the release of its 2005 Solid State debut, Thrill Seeker. The band's 2007 sleeper hit, Messengers, minted ABR as one of the pacesetters of the next generation of metal bands. The band has already proven to be the type that gets kids to put down Guitar Hero and pick up an actual guitar – look no further than the number of bands on MySpace that list ABR as an influence. With Constellations, that swelling army of fans will make sure that there's a racket from day one. "I am probably as excited for Constellations to come out as our most diehard fans," Brubaker exclaims. "I'd like to think there is something for everyone on the new album."

Already one of the year's most anticipated metal albums, Constellations will make good on the promise of the past two years, and will serve as proof-positive that August Burns Red's success is no mere solar flare-up. This supernova's here to stay.
The Devil Wears Prada
The Devil Wears Prada
The Devil Wears Prada is the musical embodiment of a generational shift. Built on a diverse array of heavy, dark, melodic and genre-defying music; hardened and sharpened by putting in road work together since the days when they had to skip class to tour: The Devil Wears Prada is at the forefront of a movement that bridges the gap between Rockstar Mayhem and the Vans Warped Tour.

The passionately inspired band’s brand new album for Roadrunner Records, cryptically titled 8:18, embodies an unflinching, uncompromising authenticity born from revelatory introspection and obsessive workmanship. The dichotomies are refreshing, invigorating and boundless. There’s an oppressive, suffocating darkness to their heavy music, counterbalanced by the hope within their collective faith. The most brutal of crowd-moving breakdowns ignite with friction, bristling against soaring melodies, progressive yet catchy riffing and keyboard soaked atmospheric esotericism. To put it simply: The Devil Wears Prada have developed the chops, the cred and the audience of a true-blue thinking person’s heavy metal band, while simultaneously welcoming fist-pumping hellraisers and youthful moshers alike. 8:18 continues the war against humanity’s dark urges, pointing the finger inward and outward through a medium that is itself both bleak and grand.

"Much of the heavy music around us suffers from a total lack of emotion. It's sort of losing an audible sense of sincerity," observes vocalist Mike Hranica. "The guitars, the drums, the songs themselves create that sorrow that I want the lyrics to tell on 8:18. And I made sure that my vocals created emotions that I have heard in post-hardcore, but that I rarely hear in breakdown-heavy metal bands like us."

Guitarist Chris Rubey concurs. "If I listen to the title track and I'm in the right mood, I will tear up because of the lyrics and vibe of the song," he confesses. "What Mike is saying with all of his lyrics on this album is extremely powerful."

The overriding theme on 8:18 is misery, exploring that mental and emotional state through its various guises, manifestations and interpretations. Tracks like Gloom, War, Black & Blue and Home for Grave spring forth from that foundation, exploiting concepts like mediocrity, existential angst and life's bigger questions under an atmosphere of musical dread, hostility and darkness.

Mike Hranica is blessed with a commanding roar, but infuses the proceedings with a literary sensibility, a commitment to self-evaluation and a painstaking modesty that levels the playing field between performer and listener beneath the surface.

Principal songwriter and guitarist Rubey is an accomplished producer in his own right. Rubey brings all of that experience to the table with his band through an understanding of the group’s fans, the result of multiple hours spent pouring through social media, YouTube comments and online forums. It all coalesces into creative leaps that are intertwined withThe Devil Wears Prada’s established identity. As he squeezes out his self-described “ADD” compositions, Rubey challenges himself not to repeat the past, both in and out of TDWP.