The Front Bottoms

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 To provide a safer environment for the public and significantly expedite fan entry into our venues, Rialto Theatre & 191 Toole have instituted a clear bag policy as of March 1st, 2022. The policy limits the size and type of bags that may be brought into our venues. The following is a list of bags that will be accepted for entry: Bags that are clear plastic or vinyl and do not exceed 12in x 6in x 12in One-gallon clear plastic freezer bags (Ziplok bag or similar) Small clutch bags, approximately 5in x 7in All bags subject to search. Clear bags are available for sale at the box office.

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ABOUT THE ARTIST

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When you turn on a record from The Front Bottoms, you hear the trials, tribulations, and triumphs of two  lifelong friends who stare down personal tragedy and the madness of a world gone haywire by simply  playing a little louder together. The duo—Brian Sella [vocals, guitar] and Mat Uychich [drums]—spin all of  these emotions into a tapestry of punk, folk, and alternative on their new full-length album, In Sickness &  In Flames

“When you listen to this, I definitely want you to feel the anxiety,” affirms Brian. “There are some pretty  rock and roll songs and heavy moments on In Sickness & In Flames. I hope the tension comes across. We  went through all of these unbelievable life changes, and then all of these insane things happened in the  world. If you get anything out of it, we want it to be that creativity can basically solve any problem and  will save us. This was made from a tense place. Look around. You literally see sickness and flames right  now, but we can grow from it. Metaphorically for The Front Bottoms and the community, we’re basically  saying, ‘There’s a lot of craziness happening, but here’s an album out of it’. This is the creativity we need  to keep our heads above water.” 

They’ve shared in that same creativity since back in grade school. The New Jersey natives began performing in high school bands and after Brian finished college, The Front Bottoms officially formed.  Brian’s mom gifted the boys 12 hours of recording time at a local studio for Christmas, resulting in their  2011 self-titled independent debut. A whirlwind of prolific output and countless gigs followed. The Front  Bottoms reached a critical peak with 2017’s Going Grey. It received praise from the likes of The FADERStereogum, VICE, A.V. Club, and more. Along the way, the band performed on Late Night with Seth  Meyers and NPR’s “Tiny Desk,” graced the stages of Coachella, Lollapalooza, Austin City Limits and  Bonnaroo, and toured with the likes of Blink-182, Manchester Orchestra, and many more. Not to  mention, the group has tallied nearly 100 million streams, sold over 500,000 album equivalents, and  launched the annual holiday festival Champagne Jam, which expands year over year at an  unprecedented rate.  

Their union only grew strong with each subsequent show and release. 

“It wouldn’t be The Front Bottoms, if there wasn’t a partnership. We just naturally always progressed by  figuring everything out together,” smiles Mat. 

“He handles the business though…I need to call him to find out my social security number,” laughs Brian. 

However, it seemed like life began testing them last year. In between tracking everywhere from their New  Jersey home studio to the famed Sonic Ranch in El Paso, TX on the Mexican border, the guys assembled  what would become In Sickness & In Flames. Following an appendicitis diagnosis, Brian underwent  emergency surgery in December. The property they co-owned as a creative hive caught fire and burned  down. Still, the musicians soldiered on. 

“It felt like every time we came home, some other shit would happen,” recalls Brian. “Finally, we finished  the album, and the pandemic hit.” 

In the middle of this upheaval, they introduced the record with “camouflage.” A palm-muted verse rolls  towards caustic confessions like, “Think I was having a mental breakdown the same time you were  painting your walls.

“It goes back to this idea of wanting to connect with nature, disappear into the background and blend in,”  Brian explains. “I wouldn’t normally wear camo, but it’s how I feel sometimes.” 

A wall of distortion absorbs lush strings on “everyone blooms” as it blossoms into a grand chorus. 

“It follows the overarching themes of growing up, coming into your own, and realizing everything you’ve  been told is a lie,” says Mat. “Flowers all bloom, but not at the same time. I’ve always related to late  bloomers. Everyone grows at his or her own pace. There’s no rush.” 

On the single “montgomery forever,” a nimble bass line crashes into fleet-fingered acoustic fretwork and  a call-and-response chant, “We used to live here; now they’re blowing it up.” 

“There was a public housing building called Montgomery that was going to be demolished in Jersey City,”  says Brian. “My girlfriend and I woke up early at like 8am to see it, and the city blew it up. It was super  emotional and intense. As I was walking back to my apartment, there was a woman with a shirt that said,  ‘Montgomery Forever’. I definitely saw her emotion. These were people’s homes. It’s the emotion of losing  everything. It sparked the inspiration for me.” 

“Fairbanks, Alaska” hinges on a thought-provoking visual as Brian admits, “I haven’t checked my mind  since I saw the Northern Lights of Fairbanks, Alaska.Refracting a burst of raw energy, a rattling scream  quakes through “leaf pile.” On the other end of the spectrum, the record closes out on the sparse piano  of the poetic ballad “make way.” 

“The original thinking of In Sickness & In Flames related to me getting married,” Brian reveals. “However,  it makes even more sense now. We needed all of this crazy stuff to happen to make the album, and now  it speaks to the times for us.” 

However, as with everything The Front Bottoms have done, it speaks beyond the times as well. 

“Everything’s been bad news, but we hope this is good news for our fans,” Mat closes out. “We’re just  documenting our lives through music.” 

“We’ve dedicated our entire lives to this,” Brian leaves off. “It’s the creative expression of what we’ve  been going through. Because of that, we keep getting closer and growing up.” 

BOILER 

When you turn on a record from The Front Bottoms, you hear the trials, tribulations, and triumphs of two  lifelong friends who stare down personal tragedy and the madness of a world gone haywire by simply  playing a little louder together.  

The New Jersey natives went from playing in the woods to performing in high school bands. After Brian  finished college, The Front Bottoms officially formed. Brian’s mom gifted the boys 12 hours of recording  time for Christmas, resulting in their 2011 self-titled independent debut. A whirlwind of prolific output  and countless gigs followed. The Front Bottoms reached a critical peak with 2017’s Going Grey. It received  praise from the likes of The FADER, Stereogum, VICE, A.V. Club, and more. Along the way, the band  performed on Late Night with Seth Meyers and NPR’s “Tiny Desk,” graced the stages of Coachella, Austin  City Limits, and Bonnaroo, and toured with the likes of Blink-182, Manchester Orchestra, and many more.  Not to mention, the group has tallied nearly 100 million streams, sold over 500,000 album equivalents,  and launched the annual holiday festival Champagne Jam, which expands year over year at an  unprecedented rate. Overcoming a series of challenges, the duo—Brian Sella [vocals, guitar] and Mat  Uychich [drums]—spin raw emotions into a tapestry of punk, folk, and alternative on their fifth full-length 

and second album for Fueled By Ramen, In Sickness & In Flames, led by the singles “camouflage,”  “everyone blooms,” and “montgomery forever.”

Manchester Orchestra

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 To provide a safer environment for the public and significantly expedite fan entry into our venues, Rialto Theatre & 191 Toole have instituted a clear bag policy as of March 1st, 2022. The policy limits the size and type of bags that may be brought into our venues. The following is a list of bags that will be accepted for entry: Bags that are clear plastic or vinyl and do not exceed 12in x 6in x 12in One-gallon clear plastic freezer bags (Ziplok bag or similar) Small clutch bags, approximately 5in x 7in All bags subject to search. Clear bags are available for sale at the box office.

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ABOUT THE ARTIST

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Centered on the deeply personal, often biographical songs of singer/guitarist Andy Hull, Georgia’s Manchester Orchestra are known for their emotive, textured blend of post-hardcore rock. Barely out of high school when they debuted with 2006’s I’m Like a Virgin Losing a Child, Manchester Orchestra gained greater recognition with 2009’s Mean Everything to Nothing, which cracked the Top 40 of the Billboard album charts. They have continued to mature, embracing a stylistically wide-ranging sound that touches upon everything from acoustic folk balladry to kinetic prog rock, and placing several Top Ten Billboard Rock Albums, including 2011’s Simple Math and 2014’s Cope. Inspired by their work crafting the soundtrack to 2016’s independent film Swiss Army Man, the group has grown increasingly concept driven, a style they brought to fruition with 2017’s A Black Mile to the Surface and 2021’s The Million Masks of God.

Formed in 2004 in Atlanta, Georgia, Manchester Orchestra grew out of songs that singer/guitarist Andy Hull had begun writing while in high school. Encouraged by positive response, he opted for homeschooling during his senior year, which afforded him enough time to compose and record in the studio. Friends began collaborating with him over time, and Manchester Orchestra soon solidified into a trio comprising Hull, bassist Jonathan Corley, and drummer Jeremiah Edmond. Hull’s songwriting noticeably progressed with the addition of his friends, and the band courted its first fans with an EP release. You Brainstorm, I Brainstorm, But Brilliance Needs a Good Editor thus appeared in 2005 through the band’s own label, Favorite Gentlemen Recordings. With the EP out, Manchester Orchestra began playing shows around the Southeast and added keyboardist Chris Freeman to the mix. Buzz about the band’s music began creating a stir beyond the Atlanta city limits, and the guys were invited to play slots at the South by Southwest and Lollapalooza festivals in 2006 before beginning to work on their full-length album that summer. The resulting I’m Like a Virgin Losing a Child was issued by the year’s end, offering up a poignant collection of memorable hooks and thoughtful narratives that showcased a similar style to acts like the Weakerthans and Death Cab for Cutie.

Eventually, studio intern turned guitarist Robert McDowell joined the lineup permanently, and as a steady buzz continued to grow — especially on Internet blogs — Manchester Orchestra snagged an opening spot on Brand New’s largely sold-out tour in spring 2007. The increased exposure caught the interest of Canvasback Recordings, which reissued the band’s debut album that summer. A second EP, Let My Pride Be What’s Left Behind, followed in October 2008, and the band remained in the studio during the subsequent months to perfect its sophomore album. Released in 2009, Mean Everything to Nothing found the band working alongside producer Joe Chiccarelli, famous for his work with the Shins and My Morning Jacket.

In 2011, the band released its third full-length studio album, Simple Math, a concept album built around Hull’s life story. They then delivered a fourth album, 2014’s heavy, post-hardcore-infused Cope. That same year, the band returned with Hope, a companion piece to Cope, featuring reworked, largely acoustic versions of all the album’s songs. Hull and McDowell then collaborated on the soundtrack to the 2016 film Swiss Army Man. Consisting entirely of layered vocal tracks, the soundtrack was well received and garnered nominations for Best Original Score for a Comedy Film and Film Music Composition of the Year at the 2016 International Film Music Critics Association Awards.

The following year, Manchester Orchestra returned with their fifth full-length album, A Black Mile to the Surface. Produced with Catherine Marks (Foals, Wolf Alice), the album found the band taking a conceptual, cinematic approach inspired by their work on Swiss Army Man. Buoyed by the singles “The Gold,” “The Alien,” and “The Moth,” the album hit number 33 on the Billboard 200 and reached number seven on the Top Rock Albums chart. A cover of the Avett Brothers’ “No Hard Feelings” appeared in 2018, followed in 2020 by the holiday-themed EP Christmas Songs, Vol. 1. A second Marks production, The Million Masks of God, arrived in 2021 and again found the band adopting a conceptual approach as they explored themes of birth, death, and what lies beyond.

Boundaries @ 191 Toole

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 To provide a safer environment for the public and significantly expedite fan entry into our venues, Rialto Theatre & 191 Toole have instituted a clear bag policy as of March 1st, 2022. The policy limits the size and type of bags that may be brought into our venues. The following is a list of bags that will be accepted for entry: Bags that are clear plastic or vinyl and do not exceed 12in x 6in x 12in One-gallon clear plastic freezer bags (Ziplok bag or similar) Small clutch bags, approximately 5in x 7in All bags subject to search. Clear bags are available for sale at the box office.

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ABOUT THE ARTIST

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Connecticut metalcore wrecking crew Boundaries are following 2019’s killer My Body In Bloom EP with their first full-length album, Your Receding Warmth, on November 13 via Unbeaten Records (pre-order). The album was recorded with producer Randy LeBoeuf (who’s also worked with Every Time I Die, The Acacia Strain, and produced the anticipated new Chamber album), and Randy’s crisp, gut-punching production is perfect for Boundaries’ sound.

The first single is “Carve,” which starts out as bone-crushing metalcore, but there’s more to this song than just straight-up mosh fuel. It’s got a soaring post-metal mid-section and there’s genuine emotion in Matt McDougal’s voice. If you dig Knocked Loose (who Boundaries have opened for) or Chamber or Sanction or other current bands in that realm, you don’t wanna sleep on this. — Brooklyn Vegan

Little Feat – Waiting for Columbus Tour

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 To provide a safer environment for the public and significantly expedite fan entry into our venues, Rialto Theatre & 191 Toole have instituted a clear bag policy as of March 1st, 2022. The policy limits the size and type of bags that may be brought into our venues. The following is a list of bags that will be accepted for entry: Bags that are clear plastic or vinyl and do not exceed 12in x 6in x 12in One-gallon clear plastic freezer bags (Ziplok bag or similar) Small clutch bags, approximately 5in x 7in All bags subject to search. Clear bags are available for sale at the box office.

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THE INDOMITABLE LITTLE FEAT

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October 2021:  Having passed through ice—the Covid winter of the past eighteen months—Little Feat is ready to bring some fire.  They’ve announced their By Request tour for November 2021, and now they’ve added the Waiting for Columbus tour of March-April 2022.  Happy Feat, indeed.

Waiting for Columbus was Feat’s first live album, and it perfectly captures their consummate playing skill with extended versions of their early classic tunes.  Feat fans have been waiting for this tour for quite a while.

The tour stoppage caused by Covid could not obscure the joy and sparkle of their incredible body of work.  As their newest song, “When All Boats Rise,” puts it:

“When All Boats Rise we will find another pathway / When All Boats Rise we will shine like stars above / When All Boats Rise we can ride the silver skyway / That day is coming soon When All Boats Rise.”

We need that kind of optimistic faith, and Little Feat is ready to supply it.  Feat, do your stuff.

The members of Little Feat 2021 are:  Bill Payne, Keyboards and Vocals; Sam Clayton, Percussion and Vocals; Fred Tackett, Guitars and Vocals, Kenny Gradney, Bass; Scott Sharrard, Guitars and Vocals; and Tony Leone, drums.  Scott joined in 2019, Tony in 2020.  Lots more on them later, but for now….

 

Little Feat is very possibly the last-man-standing example of what used to be the norm in American music, a fusion of a broad span of styles and genres into something utterly distinctive.  They combined earthy, organic material with first-rate musicianship in a combination that transcends boundaries.  Feat took California rock, funk, folk, jazz, country, rockabilly, and New Orleans swamp boogie and more, stirred it into a rich gumbo, and has been leading people in joyful dance ever since.

 

It all began in 1969 when Frank Zappa was smart enough to fire Lowell George from the Mothers of Invention and tell him to go start a band of his own.  The late Paul Barrere, Feat’s long-time guitarist, wrote a few years back of how Lowell “came to the front door of the Laurel Canyon house I was livin’ in, with that beautiful white ‘p’ bass in hand, and asked if I wanted to try out as bass player for his new band. As most who know the story’s end can tell you, as a bassist I make an excellent guitarist…”

 

Actually, there were quite a number of bass players that first year—that seat took a while to fill.  George first settled on keyboard wizard Bill Payne, then added drummer Richie Hayward and bassist Roy Estrada (also a Zappa vet).  They were quickly signed by Warner Bros. and began working on the first of twelve albums with that venerable company.

 

The name was part of the legend.  A member of the Mothers happened to mention Lowell’s small feet to him “with an expletive,” said Paul Barrere.  “Lowell deleted the expletive, and the name was born with Feat instead of Feet, just like the Beatles.  Neat, huh?”

 

The first album, Little Feat, featured the instant-classic tune “Willin’,” and the follow-up Sailin’ Shoes added “Easy to Slip,” “Trouble,” “Tripe Face Boogie,” “Cold Cold Cold” and the title track to their repertoire, as well as a new version of “Willin’” that took it from pure Lowell to a fully-developed band tune.  Estrada departed, and the band signed up (on guitar!) Paul Barrere, Kenny Gradney (bass), and Sam Clayton (percussion), and the latter remain rock-solid members of Little Feat’s rhythm section.

 

1973’s Dixie Chicken gave them the title track and “Fat Man in the Bathtub,” as good a blues as any rock band has ever written.  The hits kept coming: the title track from Feats Don’t Fail Me Now (1974), which also gave us “Rock and Roll Doctor,” “Spanish Moon,” and “Oh, Atlanta,” another Southern-based winner (pretty good for a bunch of guys from L.A.!).  1975 saw The Last Record Album and “All That You Dream.”   In 1977, Time Loves a Hero delivered the classic title song, and their career to that point was summed up with the live Waiting for Columbus, truly one of the best live albums rock has ever heard.

 

Success is hard.  It cost Feat their founder, Lowell George, who in 1979 took a break from working on Down on the Farm to do some solo dates and was struck down by a heart attack.  And it cost the band,  temporarily, their joy; shortly after, they disbanded.

 

In 1986, Barrere and Payne met up in a chance jam session and found that they could still find that inspiration.  What they had written in ”Hangin’ On To The Good Times Here“— ”…although we went our own ways, we couldn’t escape from where we came, so we find ourselves back at the table again, telling stories of survivors and friends”—was of course true, as with any righteous song.  In 1988 they returned to the road, where they’ve been ever since (excepting the pandemic), joined by Craig Fuller on vocals and Fred Tackett on guitar.  Let It Roll re-introduced them to the world and was followed by Representing the Mambo and then Shake Me Up.  Craig left and Shaun Murphy joined in 1993; early in 2009 she departed the band.

 

Live from Neon Park—the name choice was a tribute to the album cover artist most often associated with Feat— was a two-CD set taken from shows at legendary venues like San Francisco’s Fillmore Auditorium and Portland (Oregon)’s Roseland Ballroom.  The studio albums Under The Radar and Chinese Work Songs added new favorite songs, especially “Calling The Children Home” and “Just Another Sunday,” along with creative covers of Dylan, The Band, and Phish songs.

 

In the early part of the new millennium, Feat started their own Hot Tomato Records and began to share their rich archives with their fans, producing the double CD collections of rarities Raw Tomatos and Ripe Tomatos from both fan and band tapes.  2002 also yielded Live From the Ram’s Head, a two-CD acoustic show, and in ’03 came Down Upon the Suwannee, a live show recorded on the banks of the river at the Magnolia Festival in northern Florida.  Hot Tomato also gave the musicians the freedom to deliver solo work, as well, first with Fred Tackett’s In A Town Like This, and then Bill Payne’s Cielo Norte, an intimate, lyrical marriage of keyboards.

 

Their studio album from 2003 was Kickin’ It At The Barn, produced by Paul Barrere, Bill Payne, and Fred Tackett. It’s named after the place it was recorded, Tackett’s barn-cum-studio in Topanga Canyon, which lent an invaluable ambience to the undertaking. In his liner notes, faithful Feat member Paul Barrere wrote, ”If music is a conversation between the players, then we are talking like never before…this has been truly one of the most memorable recording projects we’ve done. We started with an idea to write songs on acoustic guitar and piano, like the old days before computers and samples, and then let the band interpret the music.“

 

Little Feat’s rich legacy was acknowledged at the 25th anniversary of the monumental live album Waiting for Columbus when Rhino Records put out a special two CD edition of the original concert, plus outtakes, along with Hotcakes and Outtakes:  30 Years of Little Feat, a four-CD, 83 track boxed set featuring hits from all of Feat’s albums as well as alternate takes and rarities from a rich past, which has included playing with everybody from Bob Dylan to Beck, Willie Nelson to Bonnie Raitt, Robert Plant, John Lee Hooker, and…you name it.

 

Join the Band, in many ways a summing up of all that’s preceded it, came in 2009, with re-recordings of their classic songs bringing together a vast slew of musical friends on vocals backed by Feat—Dave Matthews on “Fat Man,” Jimmy Buffett on “Champion of the World,” Emmylou Harris on “Sailin’ Shoes.”  Bill Payne said it was about locating their influences.  In some ways, it documents the way they’ve influenced the musicians who listen to them.  And it certainly documents a musical career.

 

Their latest studio work is Rooster Rag, by critical consensus their best studio album in twenty years, featuring four songs co-written by Payne and the Grateful Dead’s legendary lyricist Robert Hunter, four breakout songs by Fred Tackett, and a superb collaboration between Paul Barrere and the late Stephen Bruton.

 

If you play long enough—and Little Feat has—you have to face everything.  Richie Hayward, the sterling drummer who’d held down the beat for nearly forty years, was finally taken down by liver cancer in 2010.  The same grim pursuer caught up with Paul Barrere in 2019.  Paul will always be missed, yet paradoxically his absence also confirmed the stunning power of the music that Little Feat has made for so very long.

 

Paul’s health was precarious, and so the band needed a substitute for the last two shows in a three-week run in October, 2019, with Larry Campbell and Teresa Williams.  They found their sub in Scott Sharrard, a frequent sit-in with Bill Payne’s other band, the Doobie Brothers. Scott is best known for his role as guitarist and musical director with the late Gregg Allman, but he’s had a long and successful career in addition to that.  Born in Michigan in 1976 on the day his hero Freddie King died, he came up in the bar band culture of Milwaukee in the ‘90s, where on a given night you could hear Buddy Miles, Hubert Sumlin, Luther Allison, and Clyde Stubblefield.  Soon he was catching on with dates in Chicago, where he jammed with two legendary Muddy Waters sidemen, drummer Willie “Big Eyes” Smith and pianist Pinetop Perkins.

 

Scott’s band The Chesterfields put out three albums and toured nationally, and then he went out on his own, releasing Dawnbreaker (2005), Analog/Monolog (2008), Ante Up (2009), and most recently, Saving Grace, recorded in Muscle Shoals at FAME studio with members of the legendary Swampers and Bernard “Pretty” Purdie.

 

His time with Gregg Allman was rich, peaking when they co-wrote “My Only True Friend” for Gregg’s last solo album, Southern Blood.  The song earned a Grammy nomination for Americana Song of the Year.

 

His relationship with Little Feat goes surprisingly far back.  At the age of 12 he stayed up late to watch Feat play “Let It Roll” on “Saturday Night Live, what he called “one of my big bang moments.”  He went on, “I grew up with the lifestyle of the way Little Feat music was crafted and Lowell George was a key influence of mine.  I was an overweight, Midwestern middle class white kid and when I heard Lowell sing and play—he kind of proved to me what might be possible for who I was.  It was that deep for me as a kid.”

 

So when he got a call from Bill Payne in the fall of 2019 to fill in for Paul on two gigs (Long Island and Pennsylvania), “I took it as seriously as a heart attack.  See, the Doobie Brothers guys have been big supporters of mine and when Gregg Allman passed they adopted (Gregg Allman Band percussionist) Marc Quiñones and our road manager Vid Sutherland  and a bunch of other people.  So when Bill was looking for someone, he was on tour with the Doobies and everyone was like Scott Sharrard.  And Bill had played with me—I’d sat in with the Doobies dozens of times, just playing guitar, but I never sang with them.  So his concern was that, checking out my vocals.”

 

“I got the catalogue together, came to do the first gig.  It was on Long Island, and I had never met Kenny, Sam or Fred before.  I knew the horns because one of them, Jay Collins, was with Gregg Allman and the other guys I knew from when I used to work at Levon Helm’s Studio. And as I was checking out my rig and getting to meet the crew, the word came that Paul had passed away.   When I met Kenny and Fred and Sam for the first time, the first thing I had to do was give my condolences.  And then the announcement of his passing was the first thing that happened when I went on stage with Little Feat to hit the first note with them.  The fans didn’t even know he passed away.”

 

“Those two gigs became kind of a very spiritual moment for the band, and I just brought whatever I had to the table as a fan first and then as a musician and it worked, it just worked.  I haven’t had a lot of coincidences in my life and this was definitely one of the more powerful spaces I’ve ever been in where I feel like I was in the right place at the right time for the right reasons.”

 

Tony Leone was announced as the new drummer during the pandemic.  Best known for his 2002 collaboration with Amy Helm, Olabelle, his work in the Chris Robinson Band, Phil Lesh and Friends, and as a member of Levon Helm’s Midnight Ramble Band, Tony actually moved through Little Feat orbits several times over the years.  Paul and Fred played on Levon’s Ramble show, which led to the Midnight Ramble Band playing with Feat in Jamaica at least four times.  Tony was also twice a member of Anders Osborne’s Jazzfest spinoff band Dead Feat.

 

Tony recalled “fanboying” out on Richie when they first met, and assuming his seat is an honor he takes seriously.  “I can honestly say that almost every time I sit down behind the drums, there are a few guys that I always think of.  One of them is Levon Helm. And another one is Richie Hayward.  The thing that both of them had in common was their feel.  It wasn’t necessarily their pyrotechnical abilities to astound the audience with their virtuosity or anything like that. It was like, no, when they sat down to play a song, immediately that thing had a groove that made the music dance, and made the people want to dance…The first tune I remember hearing that I knew it was Levon was “Up on Cripple Creek” and then the first Little Feat tune that I remember hearing was “Dixie Chicken” and they’ve both got that swampy backbeat shuffle thing going on.”

 

“Whenever I’m going to play those tunes, I’m always going to consult what Richie played first and I’m always going to try to play those parts with integrity.  And not to be a clone, but to try and give them a certain feel that he had.”

 

You can go a number of ways when you spend your life on the road.  You can get eaten up by the stresses and quit, or you can hold on to your music and your friends and the joy of the people out front and keep the priorities straight the way the Featsters have.

 

Fifty years on, they’ve been up and they’ve been down and they know where they belong—standing or sitting behind their instruments, playing for you.  And anything’s possible, because the end is not in sight.

 

ABOUT NICKI BLUHM

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A San Franciscan now calling Tennessee home, Nicki Bluhm possesses a modern, clear-eyed perspective that grabs the heart and keeps you holding on to every word.

 

Bluhm’s music career began in the Cow Hollow area of San Francisco, where she recorded two solo albums and co-founded Nicki Bluhm and The Gramblers. The band wrote and performed their own music and recorded covers nostalgic to their childhoods, including their viral YouTube hit, the Hall and Oates classic “I Can’t Go For That.”

 

In 2017, Bluhm made the decision to leave California to forge a career as a solo artist in Nashville. Her ensuing solo album, To Rise You Gotta Fall (2018), plumbed the depths of hard goodbyes and hopeful beginnings.

 

Releasing in June of 2022, her new album Avondale Drive is a masterful exploration of what it means to be fully yourself, rather than a vessel for the expectations of others. “This album is a lot about building trust back in myself. Finding my own inner compass and aligning it to my authentic self,” she says.

 

Recorded in East Nashville with producer Jesse Noah Wilson, and featuring Oliver Wood, Erin Rae, A.J. Croce, Jay Bellerose, and others, Avondale Drive combines nostalgic country-rock with distinctly modern, sharp lyricism—an apt contrast for the process of studying one’s past in order to make a better future.

 

“Writing songs is often a way for me to talk myself down when my ruminating mind won’t stop,” Bluhm says, “I have to remind myself that it’s important to sit with hard feelings, to know what I’m in control of and more importantly of what I’m not. To learn how to be comfortable within the discomfort. The songs I tend to write are typically what become the mantras I need to hear most.”

 

Highlight tracks include “Friends,” a duet with Oliver Wood, “Love to Spare,” which Bluhm co-wrote with songwriter A.J. Croce, and “Learn to Love Myself,” about the self-reflection that comes when you don’t have a person around to distract you from your own flaws.

 

Avondale Drive is reminiscent of the beginnings and endings described in Bluhm’s previous album, but there is a distinctly new, mature perspective. Says Bluhm, “At the end of a relationship, sometimes the truth is the only scrap of kindness we have left to offer. [It all] goes back to the overarching theme of trusting yourself, trusting the universe and trusting it’ll all work out as it should. Calling off the war with what IS.”

 

Following appearances and collaborations with artists such as Phil Lesh, Dawes, The Band of Heathens, Little Feat, and The Infamous Stringdusters, Bluhm’s creative confidence is well-won, and her authentic voice and songwriting is all the more apparent on Avondale Drive.

DEHD

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 To provide a safer environment for the public and significantly expedite fan entry into our venues, Rialto Theatre & 191 Toole have instituted a clear bag policy as of March 1st, 2022. The policy limits the size and type of bags that may be brought into our venues. The following is a list of bags that will be accepted for entry: Bags that are clear plastic or vinyl and do not exceed 12in x 6in x 12in One-gallon clear plastic freezer bags (Ziplok bag or similar) Small clutch bags, approximately 5in x 7in All bags subject to search. Clear bags are available for sale at the box office.

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ABOUT THE ARTIST

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Upon arrival during the fraught summer of 2020, Flower of Devotion felt like Dehd’s necessary prescription for us all. That was, of course, a moment of unprecedented anxiety and uncertainty, when just contemplating the future could seem overly optimistic. But Dehd captured and shared the precarious balance between real life and real hope, a feat mirrored by instant pop melodies and infectious punk energy. The Chicago trio had the audacity to look ahead when many of us didn’t, to imagine improvement through mere existence. It was an album we needed. We need its follow-up, the triumphant Blue Skies, even more.

Dehd’s fourth album (and first for Fat Possum) is also the band’s second consecutive breakthrough, loaded with the most compelling, compulsive, and expansive songs of their career. Blue Skies offers another jolt of timely hope, only with twice the power. These 13 hits feel like flashlights in the dark, acknowledging how difficult everything from love and sex to living and dying can be while supplying the inspiration of their own experiences. “There’s a hole in my window/I was wondering how the rain was getting in,” Emily Kempf sings during the magnetic “Window,” acknowledging the problem before jubilantly exclaiming she’s moving toward something new. “Blue skies!”

The rapturous reception of Flower of Devotion gave Dehd access to more resources — budgets, studios, producers. Rather than seek something new, however, they invested in themselves, their process, and their deep belief in what they have always done. They booked the same studio where they had recorded Flower of Devotion but tripled their stay, giving themselves time to play with arrangements and delight in a wonderland of drum machines and synthesizers.

Through Dehd’s career, Jason Balla has been building his chops as a producer, so this was a chance to indulge and explore. Eric McGrady, meanwhile, considered how much more he could deliver as a drummer, adding layers to the thump of his past. And Emily, who admits that the process of making records has always been emotionally draining, focused on harnessing her indomitable energy, funneling her power into these songs without being overpowered by them. Dehd gave themselves runway to make mistakes and the space to make a statement. Blue Skies is their poignant, redemptive, and deeply fun testament to trusting and pushing yourself.

These 33 minutes run like a series of interconnected singles, each song so hooky and strong that you’ll be hard-pressed to name a favorite. The triumphant “Bad Love” is a surge of self-liberation, Emily leading the charge through an anthem about admitting your faults, seeking forgiveness, and finding a way forward. “I got a heart full/I got a heart full of redemption,” she offers at the start, a moment that suggests Springsteen writing with The Go-Go’s. A Tom Verlaine quiver to his voice, Jason takes a nighttime walk in the city as anxiety closes in during the irrepressible “Stars,” calming himself with a concrete reminder he’s still here. And there’s Eric’s splendid “Hold,” a chiming wonder with elastic bass lines and cascading piano parts that interlock beneath his hypnotic voice. He affirms the impact of simple acts of love.

But even when they sound ebullient, Dehd has never shied from troubles, the balance that has made them so magnetic. Above wafting synths and marching drum machines, “Memories” feels first like an electro dirge, memorializing lost friends. Such moments — and there are several clouds amid these Blue Skies — are pointed signals of our collective woe. Dehd presses ahead, though, into a future that offers something else if not always something better. What hope, after all, is more dependable? They end “Memories” in a refrain of pure persistence: “I’m doing all I can.” Blue Skies gets real. Blue Skies never wallows.

Toward the end of 2021, Dehd shared stages with Julien Baker, their first substantive chance to take Flower of Devotion on the road. Every night after their set, fans would tell the band how those songs had helped during the toughest times of the last two years. Those listeners had recognized what makes Emily, Jason, and Eric so compelling — they put their individual experiences on the page, then project them together with heart and empathy into instant hooks. Those post-show admissions could be a lot to process for the band, but they provided galvanizing confirmations that they’d made the right decision with Blue Skies. They would keep pulling light out of the dark with songs that feel so fucking good to hear right now.

The writing is sharper and smarter on Blue Skies. The harmonies and rhythms are more sophisticated and considered. The moods are deeper, the swings between them more inspiring. But this is still Dehd, just more wild and wonderful than ever before. “This is all we get,” Emily shouts with relish on the record’s last lines, during a song about the ways geologic deep time should free us all to live more. “Best to take the risk.” Heard, loud and clear.

10 Years @ 191 Toole

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 To provide a safer environment for the public and significantly expedite fan entry into our venues, Rialto Theatre & 191 Toole have instituted a clear bag policy as of March 1st, 2022. The policy limits the size and type of bags that may be brought into our venues. The following is a list of bags that will be accepted for entry: Bags that are clear plastic or vinyl and do not exceed 12in x 6in x 12in One-gallon clear plastic freezer bags (Ziplok bag or similar) Small clutch bags, approximately 5in x 7in All bags subject to search. Clear bags are available for sale at the box office.

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ABOUT THE ARTIST

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For nearly two decades, 10 Years have quietly pushed themselves and modern rock towards evolution. Building a formidable catalog, the group’s gold-selling 2005 breakthrough The Autumn Effect yielded the hit “Wasteland,” which went gold, infiltrated the Billboard Hot 100, and clinched #1 at Active Rock Radio and #1 on the Billboard Alternative Songs Chart. They landed three Top 30 entries on the Billboard Top 200 with Division [2008], Feeding the Wolves [2010], and Minus the Machine [2012]. Most recently, 2017’s (How to Live) As Ghosts marked a reunion between Jesse, Brian, and Matt and achieved marked success. Not only did the album bow in the Top 5 of the US Top Hard Rock Albums Chart, but it also yielded the hit “Novacaine.” The single ascended to the Top 5 of the Billboard US Mainstream Rock Songs Chart and tallied 16 million Spotify streams, alongside 29 million streams across all dsp’s. The cumulative total for all track streams from repertoire on How To Live (As Ghosts) exceeds 51 million plays. Along the way, they sold out countless headline shows and toured with everyone from Korn, Deftones, and Stone Sour to Chris Cornell and Linkin Park. The new album, Violent Allies, is a collaboration with GRAMMY® Award-winning producer and Feeding the Wolves collaborator Howard Benson [My Chemical Romance, Halestorm, Papa Roach, Three Days Grace].

Less Than Jake & Bowling For Soup: Back For The Attack Tour

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 To provide a safer environment for the public and significantly expedite fan entry into our venues, Rialto Theatre & 191 Toole have instituted a clear bag policy as of March 1st, 2022. The policy limits the size and type of bags that may be brought into our venues. The following is a list of bags that will be accepted for entry: Bags that are clear plastic or vinyl and do not exceed 12in x 6in x 12in One-gallon clear plastic freezer bags (Ziplok bag or similar) Small clutch bags, approximately 5in x 7in All bags subject to search. Clear bags are available for sale at the box office.

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ABOUT LESS THAN JAKE

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The story of ska-rockin’ maestros Less Than Jake isn’t told in their sizable discography. It can’t be calculated by the amount of road miles they’ve logged. (But if we’re forced to calculate, we think they might be a block or two short of the Van Allen belts.) Nah! Less Than Jake’s cumulative worth is all about what they bring to your party. From sweaty club shows to uproarious festival dates to opening up for America’s most beloved rock acts, these five lifers’ deeds are best measured in the smiles they’ve slapped on the faces of true believers and new listeners, alike. Silver Linings is the name of the new Less Than Jake album, their first fulllength for the Pure Noise label and the follow-up to 2013’s See The Light. It also doubles as a bunch of sonic diary pages and a mission statement that cements their conviction after two decades in this rock ‘n’ roll circus. Indeed, LTJ—frontman/guitarist Chris DeMakes, bassist/vocalist Roger Lima, trombonist Buddy Schaub, saxophonist Peter “JR” Wasilewski and new drummer Matt Yonker—have escaped most (but not all) forms of ennui, depression and violence against screen-based objects to create an endorsement of humanity. Silver Linings also does a good amount of myth-exploding in its pursuit of joy. The songwriting core of DeMakes, Lima and Wasilewski wrote all the lyrics. New drummer Matt Yonker, whose former positions included LTJ tour manager and hammering along with such punk outfits as the Teen Idols and the Queers, helps bring a new sense of urgency. And that album title? Yeah, that was decided upon long before bands began to offer face masks in their online merch stores. Pro tip: Dial back your preconceived notions. The only things the Jakes have to prove are to themselves. Their laurels aren’t so comfortable that they’d willingly choose to be painted into a retrocolored corner. While Silver Linings doesn’t skimp on the joy, fun or grooves, careful listeners will sense a bit more reality seeping into LTJ’s escapism. The calisthenic bounce of “Lie To Me” is slightly undercut by Lima’s tales of how “the flames we hold the closest burn the worse.” On the urgent track “The Test,” DeMakes dares to seek some self-examination through someone else’s prism. “Dear Me” might be the first rock song that doesn’t couch its disdain for technology with poetic metaphors. That track addresses the loss of friends via distance and tragedy. The word “love” also appears in the album’s lyrics at three junctures. That detail should not be lost on anyone. “We allowed ourselves to be vulnerable,” offers Wasilewski. “In the past, previous records’ lyrics were about leaving a specific place or time. This is more about the departures in our personal lives: family, friends, relationships. We’ve never really explored that side. With this record, we tried to pull back that curtain. We’re showing some fragility in a time when people seem so hardened. “We’re not looking for silver linings,” he clarifies. “The record is about appreciating them. Nobody appreciates them until maybe it’s too late or maybe it’s after the fact.” Don’t worry. The phrase “woe is we” isn’t in the LTJ lexicon. “King Of The Downside” is the best self-affirmation track we can learn from. “Monkey Wrench Myself” could either mean fixing one’s self or hammering said tool repeatedly into your noggin just because you can. (“Gonna do what you told me not to/I’m gonna get myself through.”) “Bill” is a loving, full-throttled tribute to legendary drummer/producer Bill Stevenson. As a member of crucial punk outfits Black Flag, Descendents and ALL, he helped blaze the trails driven on by every aggregate describing themselves with a “-punk” suffix. LTJ know this and have acted accordingly. And if you’ve been paying attention, you already know that “So Much Less” features Wasilewski’s first ever sax solo on an LTJ record. What else do you need to know about Less Than Jake in 2020? The band would tell you quite unpretentiously that they are here to bring a good time. Of course, LTJ would’ve said the exact same thing back in ’97, 2006, 2011 or 2018 when the Warped Tour’s punk ‘n’ roll roadshow was coming to an end. What makes things different now? Why, nothing less than a divided nation and a dangerous pandemic. Consider Less Than Jake the first responders when your psyche doesn’t think it wants to continue. Because we do need all the joy and levity a seasoned ska-punk band can dish out. The reality that LTJ are also feeling reminds us that some kind of triumph is within our reach. “We hope that the record transports you,” Wasilewski resigns. “We’ve always hoped our music takes listeners from the troubles of the world. Nowadays, that very act seems to be more important. Once you turn your phone and your TV off and venture outside with a mask, and actually talk to someone else, you realize that the world is not the worst place ever. We hope the takeaway from this album is that there is always a light at the end of the tunnel. It’s not that hard—it’s just easier to be downtrodden.” In 2020, there’s no “scene,” merely good times and worse ones. For Less Than Jake to call their new album anything else but Silver Linings? Well, that would be fronting.

 

ABOUT BOWLING FOR SOUP

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Known for their cheeky take on pop-punk and melodic alt-pop, Texas four-piece Bowling for Soup found mainstream success in the early 2000s with their breakout fourth album, Drunk Enough to Dance, which earned a Grammy nomination for its hooky pop culture-referencing single “Girl All the Bad Guys Want.” Over the ensuing decade, the band continued to nurture a hardcore fan base, breaking the Billboard Top 40 with 2004’s A Hangover You Don’t Deserve and finding increased success in the U.K., where they became a touring mainstay. During the course of their career, Bowling for Soup have managed a fairly diverse and prolific output within their tuneful pop-punk confines, releasing three live albums (all recorded in the U.K.), two Christmas albums, a collection of movie and television themes, and an acoustic release — they even wrote the theme song to the Disney cartoon Phineas and Ferb. After a decade with RCA‘s Jive Records, they launched their own Que-So imprint and turned to their fans to help fund albums like 2014’s Lunch. Drunk. Love. and 2016’s Drunk Dynasty.

Bowling for Soup were formed in 1994 in Wichita Falls, Texas, featuring lead vocalist/guitarist Jaret Reddick, guitarist/vocalist Chris Burney, bassist Erik Chandler, and drummer Gary Wiseman. However, they didn’t rise beyond local prominence until 1997, when a heavy touring schedule helped broaden their fan base and landed them opening spots for nationally prominent punk and ska bands. The following year, Bowling for Soup recorded a debut EP for the local FFROE label, titled Tell Me When to Whoa!; by this point, their base of operations had been moved to Denton, Texas, the site of the label’s headquarters. Later in 1998, Bowling for Soup issued their first full-length album, Rock on Honorable Ones!!! Both it and its predecessor proved to be popular around the state (Honorable Ones sold over 10,000 copies alone), and the band ended up scoring a deal with Jive/Silvertone.

For their 2000 major-label debut, Let’s Do It for Johnny!, Bowling for Soup re-recorded some of the best songs from their indie records and added a few new tracks, including lead single “The Bitch Song” and a cover of Bryan Adams’ “Summer of ’69.” Two years later, the band released Drunk Enough to Dance, and nabbed a Grammy nomination for the single “Girl All the Bad Guys Want.” Hangover You Don’t Deserve followed in 2004, and the band landed another hit single with “1985,” which helped propel Hangover to number 37 on the Billboard 200. Bowling for Soup returned in 2005 with Goes to the Movies, on which they tackled various television and movie theme songs. The Great Burrito Extortion Case followed in the fall of 2006, spearheaded by the bouncy single “High School Never Ends,” while Sorry for Partyin’ — the group’s seventh studio effort — arrived in late 2009. After rounding out the year with a holiday album, Merry Flippin’ Christmas, Vol. 1, Bowling for Soup launched an acoustic tour in 2010 and began recording their 11th studio album later that summer. The resulting Fishin’ for Woos was finished in three weeks and released in 2011; they also released a second holiday album, Merry Flippin’ Christmas, Vol. 2, that year.

In 2013 the bandmembers announced that, due to the toll the rigors of touring took on their personal lives, Bowling for Soup would no longer be touring in the U.K. after that year, which would find them returning to Europe one last time after the release of their 12th album, 2014’s entirely fan-funded Lunch. Drunk. Love. In 2014, to celebrate their 20th anniversary, they released a greatest-hits album called Songs People Actually Liked, Vol. 1: The First 10 Years 1994-2003, which featured newly re-recorded versions of 17 songs along with one new track. Two years later, they again turned to their fans via PledgeMusic to help fund their next studio effort. Released in October 2016, Drunk Dynasty was Bowling for Soup’s 13th studio album. In 2018, the band decided they’d give the U.K. one more go and returned overseas for their Get Happy Tour which included a February date at London’s Brixton Academy. That show was released later in the year as Live from Brixton: Older, Fatter, Still the Greatest Ever! In January 2019, it was confirmed by the band that founding bassist Erik Chandler had left Bowling for Soup and was being replaced by Rob Felicetti. ~ Steve Huey, Rovi

 

Murder By Death & Amigo The Devil: Tour From The Crypt

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 To provide a safer environment for the public and significantly expedite fan entry into our venues, Rialto Theatre & 191 Toole have instituted a clear bag policy as of March 1st, 2022. The policy limits the size and type of bags that may be brought into our venues. The following is a list of bags that will be accepted for entry: Bags that are clear plastic or vinyl and do not exceed 12in x 6in x 12in One-gallon clear plastic freezer bags (Ziplok bag or similar) Small clutch bags, approximately 5in x 7in All bags subject to search. Clear bags are available for sale at the box office.

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ABOUT MURDER BY DEATH

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As trailblazers of the early 2000s indie-Americana style, the Louisville, KY-based quintet finds a way of taking tried & true rock-and-roll and knocking it slightly off axis, into tottering revolutions of something eerie, emotional, immediate, lush, and uniquely theirs. 

 

On the surface, Murder By Death is a Louisville, KY sextet with a wry, ominous name. But behind the geography and moniker is a band of meticulous and literary songwriters matched by a specific brand of brooding, anthem-riding balladry and orchestral indie rock.

 

Murder By Death’s path began in the early 2000s as most Midwestern college-town groups do, by playing to small crowds at ratty venues and frenzied house parties. While many of their formative-year scene-mates failed to make it much further than campustown’s borders, Murder By Death translated their anonymous beginnings into a 20+ year career founded on a bedrock of eight full-length albums, tireless D.I.Y. touring and performing ethics, and, most importantly, a dedicated, cult-like fanbase.

 

ABOUT AMIGO THE DEVIL

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Danny Kiranos, the Austin-based songwriter behind the Amigo the Devil project, has somehow managed to meld the worlds (and fanbases) of traditional folk, country music, rock, and metal into one.  The sonic experience is morbid, yet poetic and oddly romantic.  His unique artistic perspective and ability to connect with audiences has allowed him to amass a dedicated, cult-like fan-base. Loaded with sing-alongs – and an unsuspecting dose of humor to make otherwise grim topics accessible for fans of every genre – the songs still remain deeply rooted in the tradition of story-telling…something that seems to be a lot less common nowadays. Attending an Amigo the Devil show is an experience: you become one with a wildly prophetic man, armed only with his entrancing voice and a banjo, and bear witness to an astounding performance that will stick with you for a long time.

A key figure in the U.S. ‘murder folk’ scene, Kiranos was initially influenced by the likes of Tom Waits, Nick Cave and Godspeed! You Black Emperor.  Following a number of well-received single and EP releases, the debut album by Amigo the Devil ‘Everything Is Fine’ was produced by Ross Robinson, renowned for his work with major league hard rock/metal acts such as Korn, Slipknot, At The Drive In, and Glassjaw. The album also features drummer Brad Wilk (Rage Against the Machine, Audioslave, Prophets of Rage) sitting in on the entire recording session.  

His follow-up record and latest release, ‘Born Against’, reveals him to be more than a one-trick pony stylistically. “Every new record is an opportunity to sit and think about how much has changed in your life and the world around you,” Kiranos says. “It’s a new opportunity to bring in both new and old influences. I really wanted to dive into ideas that I’d either been avoiding or ignoring within myself and figure out ways to align them with music I grew up listening to. Influences that may have been set aside in our older recordings.”

Kiranos, who grew up in Miami in a multicultural household, decamped to Dallas to record the album at the venerable Modern Electric Studio with Beau Bedford (Texas Gentlemen). This marked the first time Kiranos had explored some of the world music he’d long loved, including Eastern European folk and Australian country (“It has such an amazing sound to it,” he says of the honky-tonk of Down Under. “The rhythms are so dry and brutal.”) Kiranos felt Bedford was the only producer who could draw those sounds out of him. Together they entered the studio with merely the skeletons of the songs Kiranos had written. One by one, they fleshed them out in wildly inventive fashion. To say they threw the kitchen sink at this album would be an understatement; these guys threw the whole damn shack. 

 

“The Fellowship” – as Amigo’s die-hard fans refer to themselves – continues to grow with each new show played and album released.  His continued connection with audiences and unique, empathic lyrics are sure to carry Amigo the Devil into the hearts of many more. There is hope in the volatile, peace in the macabre, and light not just inside the tunnel but all around, and Amigo the Devil is here to tell us how.

 

ABOUT KATACOMBS

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Katacombs is the name Katerina Kiranos landed on after years of building sculptural furniture of bone and wood. Born in Miami to a Spanish mother and Greek father, she spent the majority of her early life bouncing between multiple cultures and wanting to adapt. The common thread anywhere she landed was her love for music. Piano lessons as a child led to days on end of writing and recording from her makeshift bedroom-studio as a teen, which turned into years of collecting songs- all just to store them away. Though she took a detour career-wise, she continued to play where she could and could never escape the urge to spend every day honing her first true passion. She played keys in a few bands and dabbled in open mics but always ended up feeling best in a dark room, single-handedly curating dramatic and ethereal melodies. Set on finally sharing that part of her world, the one most sacred, she started with a small body of work that embodies a wide range of some of her deeply rooted experiences and influences. 

 

“You Will Not”, her debut EP, is a collection of songs that individually represent a place and time of her life, amounting to a rather emotional rollercoaster that traverses geographical borders and genres, hitting the highs and the lows of self-discovery.

HEALTH @ 191 Toole

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 To provide a safer environment for the public and significantly expedite fan entry into our venues, Rialto Theatre & 191 Toole have instituted a clear bag policy as of March 1st, 2022. The policy limits the size and type of bags that may be brought into our venues. The following is a list of bags that will be accepted for entry: Bags that are clear plastic or vinyl and do not exceed 12in x 6in x 12in One-gallon clear plastic freezer bags (Ziplok bag or similar) Small clutch bags, approximately 5in x 7in All bags subject to search. Clear bags are available for sale at the box office.

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ABOUT THE ARTIST

WEBSITE | FACEBOOK  | INSTAGRAM | TWITTER | LISTEN

The last two years changed music for everyone. They might have changed HEALTH for the better.

 

Three years after VOL.4 :: SLAVES OF FEAR, the L.A. trio’s ferocious entry into the world of heavy music, HEALTH return with the second half of their DISCO4 series. On the first installment in 2020, they swapped remixes for original collaborations with Perturbator, 100 Gecs and JPEGMAFIA.

 

A whole lot went to hell in the meantime, forcing the band to re-invent how they wrote music together. For DISCO4 :: PART II they cut it fast and mean, recruiting both legends and nascent contenders of heavy music and its many peripheral genres.

 

The centerpiece of DISCO4 :: Part II is the Nine Inch Nails collaboration “ISN’T EVERYONE,” which re-unites HEALTH with their early-career arena tourmates. The mesh between Trent Reznor’s growls and Jake Duzsik’s gossamer melodies—all over a gigantic synth barrage—feels like a new moment in industrial music.

 

On “COLD BLOOD,” their latest single with metal titans Lamb of God, HEALTH show they can devote themselves to a genre and detonate it all in the same track. Its blistering heaviness juxtaposed against album cuts like the raucous “GNOSTIC FLESH/MORTAL HELL” (with noise-rap banshee Backxwash and the virtuosically scabrous trio Ho99o9) or the contemplative “STILL BREATHING” (co-piloted with teenage post-punk experimentalist Ekkstacy), demonstrates the breadth of HEALTH’s sonic palette and ability to incorporate what heavy music looks like today and going forward.

 

From their twitchy 2007 debut, through the groundbreaking 2012 score for Rockstar Games’ Max Payne 3 and 2015’s DEATH MAGIC, multi-instrumentalists/producers Jacob Duzsik and John Famiglietti, and drummer Benjamin Miller, snuck beauty and rigor into blinding noise. They draped moody violence over trap beats and warehouse rave sounds alike.

 

HEALTH are not only making the heaviest, most genre-obliterating music of their career. They’re documenting just how insane it feels to be alive right now.