John Mark McMillan @ 191 Toole

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 To provide a safer environment for the public and significantly expedite fan entry into our venues, Rialto Theatre & 191 Toole have instituted a clear bag policy as of March 1st, 2022. The policy limits the size and type of bags that may be brought into our venues. The following is a list of bags that will be accepted for entry: Bags that are clear plastic or vinyl and do not exceed 12in x 6in x 12in One-gallon clear plastic freezer bags (Ziplok bag or similar) Small clutch bags, approximately 5in x 7in All bags subject to search. Clear bags are available for sale at the box office.

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ABOUT THE ARTIST

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John Mark McMillan (born November 27, 1979) is an American singer, songwriter and musician. In 2002, McMillan released his debut album Hope Anthology, Volume 1. This independent album was followed by The Song Inside: The Sounds of Breaking Down in 2005, which included the track “How He Loves”. The song was successful despite the album’s independent release, and has been covered by several well-known artists within the Christian music industry including the David Crowder Band. McMillan released his third album, The Medicine, independently in 2008, and re-released the same album under the Integrity Music label in 2010. Economy followed in 2011 with Integrity Music. In 2014, McMillan and Josh Lujan Loveless formed Lionhawk Records, and Borderland became the first album released under this new label. Borderland was released after a successful Kickstarter campaign, where he raised close to double the goal. The album debuted at No. 41 on the Billboard 200 and No. 4 on Billboard’s Top Christian Album chart. McMillan’s subsequent studio albums were all released via Lionhawk Records. His next studio album, Mercury & Lightning, was released in 2017, and his most recent studio album, Peopled with Dreams was released in 2020.

Teddy Swims

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 To provide a safer environment for the public and significantly expedite fan entry into our venues, Rialto Theatre & 191 Toole have instituted a clear bag policy as of March 1st, 2022. The policy limits the size and type of bags that may be brought into our venues. The following is a list of bags that will be accepted for entry: Bags that are clear plastic or vinyl and do not exceed 12in x 6in x 12in One-gallon clear plastic freezer bags (Ziplok bag or similar) Small clutch bags, approximately 5in x 7in All bags subject to search. Clear bags are available for sale at the box office.

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ABOUT THE ARTIST

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Teddy Swims is a lover. The 29-year-old artist, who merges honeyed soul with raucous rock energy and pleasing pop hooks, writes nearly all his songs about falling in or out of romantic entanglements. He zeroes in his focus on his latest EP, Tough Love—a six-song collection of heartbreak horror stories and earnest declarations of devotion. “To me, that’s just all there is,” he says. “You’re either making love or crying about it.” The Atlanta native, born Jaten Dimsdale, has been tugging at heartstrings since posting a series of covers from his bedroom studio, which generated hundreds of millions of views and scored him a deal with Warner Records. Teddy changed his focus to introspective originals on 2020’s Unlearning EP and garnered praise from American Songwriter, Billboard, Rolling Stone, among others. Soon, performances on The Kelly Clarkson Show, Today, and The Late Show With Stephen Colbert cemented his status as a rising star. With more than 500 million global streams to his credit, as well as a social following that exceeds 8 million, Teddy’s songs of devotion have clearly connected. And part of reaching that audience, for him, is getting to show his love in person.

Dayglow: People In Motion Tour

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 To provide a safer environment for the public and significantly expedite fan entry into our venues, Rialto Theatre & 191 Toole have instituted a clear bag policy as of March 1st, 2022. The policy limits the size and type of bags that may be brought into our venues. The following is a list of bags that will be accepted for entry: Bags that are clear plastic or vinyl and do not exceed 12in x 6in x 12in One-gallon clear plastic freezer bags (Ziplok bag or similar) Small clutch bags, approximately 5in x 7in All bags subject to search. Clear bags are available for sale at the box office.

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ABOUT THE ARTIST

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“Then It All Goes Away” is the exuberant new single from Dayglow, the project from Austin-based Sloan Struble. Here we see Struble harmonize over catchy claps, piano and even the cowbell gets a moment. In an era of music when most songs take a team of co-writers and producers to create, Dayglow’s music remains uniquely Sloan’s – crafted solely by him. He reflects “I made “Then It All Goes Away” after coming home from my Fall 2021 North America tour. I started writing the bassline during my morning coffee and I finished the full composition by the end of the day. It felt so fresh and natural to write-I was just having fun honestly. It felt like a year’s worth of unconscious ideas all came to the front of my brain at once and just spilled out. I was really just thinking of my fans the whole time making it and imagining “how can I make a Dayglow song that feels so familiar, yet feels like a brand new experience entirely?’

Announced alongside “Then It All Goes Away”, Dayglow’s new album People in Motion continues Struble’s joyous quest to create music that makes people feel good. End to end, these 10 tracks—conceptualized, written, played, and produced by Struble—are delightfully pure, hyper-melodic manifestations of Struble’s desire to steer clear of conflict or drama and offer someone something to love.

But People in Motion isn’t all sunshine and rainbows. There is a depth to Dayglow here, a real sense that Struble has faced obstacles of his own and chosen to stand atop them. “I make music because I love making it,” said Struble. “I just love recording and producing.” That is the inarguable takeaway of People in Motion, a record about finding something you love and singing about it out loud.

Since Dayglow burst onto the scene, Sloan Struble has toured the globe—selling out his North American headline tour, a slew of UK/EU dates, and has graced festival stages including Lollapalooza, Austin City Limits, Bonnaroo, and Corona Capital. He has appeared on The Tonight Show with Jimmy Fallon, The Late Show with Stephen Colbert, as well as the iconic Austin City Limits on PBS, a highlight for the Austin native.

Fans around the world haven’t just come out for the shows but they’ve listened and streamed and streamed, more than a billion times in fact. His debut single “Can I Call You Tonight,” from his debut record Fuzzybrain, not only went Platinum but was also 2020’s biggest independent Alternative Hit. The song hit #2 at both US Alternative and Triple A radio. Its official video has become a favorite on YouTube, sparking a wave of fan-made spin offs. Dayglow’s sophomore album Harmony House didn’t disappoint either. With its hard-won and palpable sincerity, it garnered acclaim from Billboard, NPR, Ones to Watch, The Talkhouse, and NME.

The year ahead will see Dayglow continue to reach new highs with a confirmed world tour and more festival spots including Bonnaroo, Firefly, Outside Lands, Reading & Leeds and more.

Municipal Waste

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 To provide a safer environment for the public and significantly expedite fan entry into our venues, Rialto Theatre & 191 Toole have instituted a clear bag policy as of March 1st, 2022. The policy limits the size and type of bags that may be brought into our venues. The following is a list of bags that will be accepted for entry: Bags that are clear plastic or vinyl and do not exceed 12in x 6in x 12in One-gallon clear plastic freezer bags (Ziplok bag or similar) Small clutch bags, approximately 5in x 7in All bags subject to search. Clear bags are available for sale at the box office.

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ABOUT THE ARTIST

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From choosing a name that makes them sound like some sort of urban public works department to their music itself, Richmond, Virginia’s Municipal Waste openly bow down to the memory of ’80s thrash metal and crossover decades after, and a few hundred miles away from, the original movement’s heyday in New York City. Emerging in 2001 with an eponymous EP, the group’s 2003 debut long-player, Waste Em All, helped pave the way for a crossover resurgence in the early 2000s. They continued to carry the thrash-punk torch on subsequent outings like Massive Aggressive (2009) and Slime and Punishment (2017), and Electrified Brain (2022), with vocalist Tony Foresta and guitarist Ryan Waste serving as the group’s sole constant members.

Led by picturesquely named vocalist Tony “Guardrail” Foresta, Municipal Waste played their first show on New Year’s Eve 2001, then spent the next few years working on demos, recording the odd EP and split release, and juggling musicians until solidifying its membership around Guardrail, guitarist Ryan Waste, and bassist Land Phil. Veteran drummer Dave Witte (ex-, , , etc.) joined their ranks shortly after the band signed with and recorded 2004’s Waste Em All with producer Corey Smoot (aka Flattus Maximus of ). The album was instantly embraced by discerning metal fans for its retro-tastic revival, received overwhelmingly positive reviews, and landed Municipal Waste supporting slots on tours with and . Late 2005 saw the unveiling of the band’s equally impressive sophomore effort, Hazardous Mutation, which helped them break big across Europe, and resulted in even more touring opportunities. Two years later, the group once again returned to the studio with producer Zeuss (, , etc.), and emerged with their third irreverent opus, The Art of Partying, which was followed by a headlining tour of Europe and a series of dates with crossover legends . Massive Aggressive arrived in 2009 to accolades both at home and abroad, as did 2012’s The Fatal Feast, their first outing for . The band tapped bassist Land Phil to handle the engineering of their sixth studio long-player, 2017’s Slime and Punishment, which landed at the number three slot on the U.S. Heatseekers chart. In 2019 the band issued The Last Rager, a reliably punishing four-song EP, and in 2022 they released their seventh full-length effort, the relentless Electrified Brain, which was recorded in Philadelphia with producer Arthur Rizk (, ). ~ Eduardo Rivadavia, Rovi

La Dispute @ 191 Toole

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 To provide a safer environment for the public and significantly expedite fan entry into our venues, Rialto Theatre & 191 Toole have instituted a clear bag policy as of March 1st, 2022. The policy limits the size and type of bags that may be brought into our venues. The following is a list of bags that will be accepted for entry: Bags that are clear plastic or vinyl and do not exceed 12in x 6in x 12in One-gallon clear plastic freezer bags (Ziplok bag or similar) Small clutch bags, approximately 5in x 7in All bags subject to search. Clear bags are available for sale at the box office.

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ABOUT THE ARTIST

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La Dispute has never been a band prone to settling. The five-piece from Grand Rapids, Michigan, is responsible for some of the most uncompromising, experimental hardcore music of the last decade. From their 2008 debut, Somewhere at the Bottom of the River Between Vega and Altair, to 2011’s Wildlife, to 2015’s Rooms of the House, La Dispute have continually pushed themselves to find new ways to portray some of the most difficult and universally affecting subject matters. Casting a wide stylistic net that includes – but isn’t limited to – jazz, blues, spoken word, screamo and prog rock, La Dispute have developed a sound that, while constantly evolving, is unmistakably theirs.

It can be difficult for punk and hardcore bands in particular to evolve and maintain momentum simultaneously the longer they stay active. At a time of economic uncertainty, and with the music industry not being lucrative as it once was, creativity and reality are often at odds with each other. In spite of this, La Dispute has maintained the same attitude they started with. They are a band figuring out, as we all are, how to live meaningfully while also trying to make meaningful art without compromise. Panorama, then, is another chapter in a discography that tells everyday stories in a remarkable way. It takes you deep within the heart of the world we live in, which may not always be a comfortable or comforting place to be, but at the very least it’s a reminder that we’re not there alone.

Circles Around The Sun @ 191 Toole

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 To provide a safer environment for the public and significantly expedite fan entry into our venues, Rialto Theatre & 191 Toole have instituted a clear bag policy as of March 1st, 2022. The policy limits the size and type of bags that may be brought into our venues. The following is a list of bags that will be accepted for entry: Bags that are clear plastic or vinyl and do not exceed 12in x 6in x 12in One-gallon clear plastic freezer bags (Ziplok bag or similar) Small clutch bags, approximately 5in x 7in All bags subject to search. Clear bags are available for sale at the box office.

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ABOUT THE ARTIST

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Circles Around The Sun’s unconventional origin is defined by a serendipitous twist of fate. Acclaimed guitarist Neal Casal was asked to record a handful of Grateful Dead-influenced instrumentals to be played during the set breaks at The Dead’s “Fare Thee Well” concerts in 2015. To accomplish the task, Casal would recruit keyboardist Adam MacDougall, bassist Dan Horne and drummer Mark Levy to join him in the studio. That was supposed to be the extent of it. Fast forward to the recordings being played over the stadium’s PA at the shows. The response from the audience was uniformly resounding, quite literally blowing up the internet with questions as to where this magical music came from and ultimately pleas for more. 

 

To appease the demand, Circles Around The Sun released those recordings as their debut album, ‘Interludes for the Dead.’ It was followed by several acclaimed live performances. Again, the response was so positive, and the band was having so much fun making music together, that they decided to keep going. Indeed, the chemistry of the four musicians was instant and undeniable. 

 

Circles Around the Sun—often shortened to CATS—returned to the studio in 2018 to record the double album, ‘Let It Wander,’ offering seven focused performances filled with imaginative musical turns and electrifying improvisation. Rolling Stone wrote: “‘Let It Wander’ is a set of even deeper spells that thread suggestions of Little Feat–style grooves and Bernie Worrell’s percolating synthesizers in Parliament-Funkadelic through the German mid-Seventies space travel of Tangerine Dream and the offbeat churn of the Dead’s “Estimated Prophet.'” 

 

More tours followed, including sold out headline shows across the country, support dates playing theaters with Greensky Bluegrass and high profile festival appearances. The band recorded an EP with drummer Joe Russo, as well as, a follow up full-length album with producer Jim Scott. With their future appearing brighter than ever, fate once again intervened. This time it wouldn’t be as kind. Co-founder/guitarist Neal Casal unexpectedly passed away in August 2019, leaving the band’s future in question. After much soul-searching and per wishes Casal left behind for the band to continue in his absence, Circles Around the Sun has continued to record and tour, releasing their self-titled third LP in 2020 that had be tracked prior to Casal’s passing. In 2022, the band added John Lee Shannon as a permanent member on guitar who, fittingly, was among Casal’s favorite young guitarists. 

 

The band’s most recent single, “Language,” a collaboration with harpist Mikaela Davis was released in March 2022 and offers a sneak peak at new music being recorded for an album release in Fall 2022. On the touring front, Circles Around the Sun recently completed a cross-country U.S. tour with many more club and festival dates planned for the remainder of the year, including appearances at Sacred Rose Festival, Whale Rock Music Festival and Santa Cruz Mountain Sol Fest. , the surviving members decided to carry on to keep Neal’s spirit alive and honor what he’d created. 

 

With a slate of tour dates scheduled for the foreseeable future and plans being made for their next album release, fans can count on many more revolutions around the bright, burning star as fate continues to play its hand for Circles Around The Sun.

Dirty Honey + Dorothy – California Dreamin Tour

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 To provide a safer environment for the public and significantly expedite fan entry into our venues, Rialto Theatre & 191 Toole have instituted a clear bag policy as of March 1st, 2022. The policy limits the size and type of bags that may be brought into our venues. The following is a list of bags that will be accepted for entry: Bags that are clear plastic or vinyl and do not exceed 12in x 6in x 12in One-gallon clear plastic freezer bags (Ziplok bag or similar) Small clutch bags, approximately 5in x 7in All bags subject to search. Clear bags are available for sale at the box office.

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ABOUT DIRTY HONEY

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Some musicians take a while to build an audience and connect with fans. For the Los Angeles-based quartet Dirty Honey, success came right out of the gate… 
 Released in March 2019, the band’s debut single, “When I’m Gone,” became the first song by an unsigned artist to reach No. 1 on Billboard’s Mainstream Rock chart. Their second single, “Rolling 7s,” went into the Top 5. Dirty Honey opened for The Who, Guns ’N Roses, Slash and Alter Bridge, and was the “must-see” at major rock festivals such as Rocklahoma, Louder Than Life, Heavy MTL, and Epicenter. On their first U.S. headline tour, the band sold out every date. 
 The band (Marc LaBelle/vocals, John Notto/guitar, Justin Smolian/bass, and Corey Coverstone/drums) worked again with producer Nick DiDia (Rage Against the Machine, Pearl Jam) on their self-titled album that captures the lightning-in-a-bottle dynamics and energy of their live sound. The new Dirty Honey upcoming album indeed builds on the band’s output to date, driven by the smoking lead single “California Dreamin’” that muses about life’s ebbs and flows, even in paradise. With airtight songwriting that plays up their strengths: sexy, bluesy, nasty rock’n’roll, melodic hard rock, and soulful ‘70s blues-rock. 
 Dirty Honey is about to take 2022 by storm.

 

ABOUT DOROTHY

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Gifts From The Holy Ghost, Dorothy Martin’s third studio album as frontwoman for the pseudonymous, rock band Dorothy, is the album she’s always wanted, and has perhaps been destined to make. Born from a sense of divine, spiritual urgency, it’s Dorothy’s most bombastic and victoriously rock and roll work yet.

While the band’s first, irreverently named album ROCKISDEAD, was made on a combination of whiskey and heartbreak—inspiring Rolling Stone to name them one of rock’s most exciting new acts, and JAY-Z to sign them to his label Roc Nation—Gifts was built on sobriety, health and spiritualism, in a way that reverses the clichéd ‘good girl gone bad narrative’.

Balanced on a great rock and roll spectrum, encompassing everything from swampy blues to ‘90s alternative, on Gifts, Dorothy has fulfilled her purpose as an artist, entertainer and spiritual being. She’s conquered darkness with light, numbness with feeling, disharmony with unity—all while delivering one of this year’s most fun rock and roll records.

The Calling @ 191 Toole

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 To provide a safer environment for the public and significantly expedite fan entry into our venues, Rialto Theatre & 191 Toole have instituted a clear bag policy as of March 1st, 2022. The policy limits the size and type of bags that may be brought into our venues. The following is a list of bags that will be accepted for entry: Bags that are clear plastic or vinyl and do not exceed 12in x 6in x 12in One-gallon clear plastic freezer bags (Ziplok bag or similar) Small clutch bags, approximately 5in x 7in All bags subject to search. Clear bags are available for sale at the box office.

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ABOUT THE ARTIST

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Co-founded in 1999 by vocalist Alex Band and guitarist Aaron Kamin, the Calling found a home amongst such ready-for-radio rock acts of the early 21st century as Matchbox TwentyTrain, and Fastball. Kamin and Band, both natives of Los Angeles, co-founded the group as teenagers (Kamin was dating Band‘s sister at the time), and a development deal with RCA followed shortly thereafter. Instrumental role players were recruited and an album was recorded, resulting in the release of Camino Palmero in July 2001. Although largely filled with post-grunge rock, the record became a popular release on the strength of “Wherever You Will Go,” a love ballad that became an inescapable Top Five hit in multiple countries. Camino Palmero sold more than five million copies worldwide and went gold in America, thus setting the stage of the Calling’s return in June 2004 with Two. The band’s popularity had already dwindled by that point, however, and the Calling went on indefinite hiatus one year later, with Alex Band going on to pursue a solo career. ~ Greg Prato, Rovi

Fontaines DC @ 191 Toole

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 To provide a safer environment for the public and significantly expedite fan entry into our venues, Rialto Theatre & 191 Toole have instituted a clear bag policy as of March 1st, 2022. The policy limits the size and type of bags that may be brought into our venues. The following is a list of bags that will be accepted for entry: Bags that are clear plastic or vinyl and do not exceed 12in x 6in x 12in One-gallon clear plastic freezer bags (Ziplok bag or similar) Small clutch bags, approximately 5in x 7in All bags subject to search. Clear bags are available for sale at the box office.

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ABOUT THE ARTIST

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‘Skinty Fia,’ the title of the much-anticipated third album by Fontaines D.C, translates to English as “the damnation of the deer.”

 

“And the Irish giant deer is an extinct species,” explains bassist Conor Deegan III aka Deego. “But ‘skinty fia’ is also used as an expletive, in the way you’d say ‘For fuck’s sake’ if you bang your arm on a table or whatever. We just thought there was something really beautiful about that, because it’s really representative of Irish culture in some sense. We were interested in the idea of something really precious or sentimental and attached to family, but also something that’s been taken away from us. Which doesn’t mean we can’t cherish it.”

 

Indeed, and the band’s thoughts on Irish identity are crucial to ‘Skinty Fia’ as they have relocated from their home country. 2019’s ‘Dogrel’ was mostly set in Dublin and was littered with snapshots of the city’s characters, like the cabbie in “Boys In The Better Land” who “spits out ‘Brits out!’, only smokes Carroll’s”. By contrast, their markedly different 2020 follow-up ‘A Hero’s Death’ was largely written on tour and documented the dislocation and disconnection the band felt from Ireland as they had new adventures around the globe. This time, they’re addressing their Irishness from afar as they recreate new lives for themselves elsewhere and try to resolve the need to broaden their horizons with the affection they still clearly feel for the land and people they’ve left behind. “It’s about being Irish and expressing that in London, and what can you take with you that makes you feel connected to home,” Deego explains. “We really tried to hold on to the things that made us Irish. There’s a sentimentality of sitting in an Irish pub in London, surrounded by other Irish people and it’s 4am, the lights are going off and half-remembering these old songs. On the other hand, there’s something dark and a little bit bleak about that.”

 

Such new and richly maturing lyrical concerns demanded something different from the music, and the quintet have accordingly metamorphosed again. There are still echoes of ‘Dogrel’’s rumbustious rock ’n’ roll and the bleaker atmospheres of ‘A Hero’s Death’. However, the third in the triumvirate is much more expansive and cinematic. New elements range from choral harmonies to drum ’n’ bass-influenced percussive grooves, and Irish traditional music to electronic dance-rock. On one song the solitary instrument is an accordion. Fontaines D.C. are still primarily a guitar-based band, but they are in a state of constant evolution. This time, the result is an album of shifting moods, startling insight, maturity, and considerable emotional wallop.

 

“There’s definitely a spiritual thread between the three albums,” front man Grian Chatten considers with trademark gentle intensity, reflecting on the “huge personal growth” that has accompanied their travels. “We’ve now found homes, places to live, and nurtured our relationships. The songs are different because we’ve got greater emotional tools.”

 

The five-piece toured ‘Dogrel’ – and themselves – into the ground, ending up hardly speaking due to pure exhaustion. ‘A Hero’s Death’ was written as the band reconnected in Dublin, rediscovered the joys of being in the group, and came to terms with the previous year’s dislocation and disorientation. Then suddenly the pandemic struck, meaning ‘A Hero’s Death’ was initially delayed for two months then released as the world was locked down. “It was completely ironic that we wrote an album about feeling disconnected,” reflects Deego – drily, “and by the time we got to release it, everyone was disconnected, including us.”

 

Thus, the musicians scattered to their respective lockdowns in places such as the west coast of Ireland or – for Chatten – his parents’ house in Dublin. In isolation, they all beavered away, working on home demos, and experimenting with different things until a reunion meant they had the beginnings of a third album. As guitarist Conor Curley remembers, “When we eventually got into a room together there was a whiteboard of about 24 ideas, which we started fleshing out.”

 

Remarkable opener “In ár gCroíthe go deo” (meaning In Our Hearts Forever) was one of the first to be realised, simply “falling out” of a continuous jam session. The band had been moved by a story in The Irish Post about a woman living in England who was battling The Church Of England for permission to have the inscription on her gravestone but was told the Irish language was “provocative.” After laying down the haunting opening mantra of “In ár cgroíthe go deo” that begins the song, the band emerged to hear the news that she was going to be allowed to have it on her gravestone. “It’s the craziest thing,” says Deego, “but had we known that beforehand I’m not sure we’d have sung it with the same conviction.” Fontaines D.C. are not a band to shy away from difficult issues or uncomfortable concerns. “I Love You,” which emerged from that same continuous jam, finds Chatten addressing his guilt at becoming successful and leaving Ireland. With its bittersweet address, references to Fianna Fáil and Fine Gael, and the recent scandal which unearthed eight hundred tiny skeletons [“This island’ s run by sharks with children’s bones stuck in their jaws.”] his words dig deep. In the disturbingly infectious “Jackie Down The Line,” the singer observes an abusive relationship and cycles of dysfunction, whether hereditary or behavioural. The darkness of the lyrics “I will hurt you, I’ll desert you” is juxtaposed with a brighter albeit nuanced tune to dazzling effect.

 

Where ‘Dogrel’ reflected the band’s daily soundtrack at the time, this time around inspiration included Primal Scream’s ‘XTRMNTR,’ sub bass, Death In Vegas’s ‘The Contino Sessions’ and Pixies’/Sonic Youth’s 90s alt-rock. Throughout the album, guitarist Carlos O’Connell felt those influences shape his overall approach. Epic ‘Skinty Fia’ title track arrived after he’d been playing around with an old Death In Vegas tune, producing something sublimely simple and groovy of his own. Although Chatten is still the primary songwriter, O’Connell also came up with music and words for the big guitar-y “Big Shot.” The riff and tune came to him after he’d been blasting Nirvana’s ‘Live At Reading’ album to clear lockdown cobwebs on long “dangerously fast” drives through country roads. Where success can go to musicians’ heads, the guitarist wrote the lyrics about insignificance in the greater scheme of things and the difficulty of “being in the spotlight but retreating to a place in my head where I become a spectator of the world.”

 

A lockdown jaunt of a different nature produced the hypnotic, mantra-like “How Cold Love Is.” Chatten had visited the sea and staring out at the cold raging mass brought inspiration. Returning to Dublin, he wrote about “the power we give to why we love, and the thread that can exist between a relationship and a vice, such as alcohol. They can be the same kind of thing and a cold experience.” The song’s repetitive, drill-like quality is deliberate: “To sound like someone jabbing at your forehead.”

On “Roman Holiday,” Chatten’s words reflect his experiences as an Anglo-Irishman in London, the line “I don’t wanna see the Queen. I already sing her song” referring to the English language. Meanwhile, the powerfully insistent “Bloomsday” is named after Ireland’s James Joyce day and employs a magical, wistful melody to address the singer’s romantic relationship with Dublin’s “rain, bars, pints and camaraderie,” but is tempered by the stark realisation that “at some point you have to realise that you’re not walking in the footsteps of James Joyce.”

 

The rapturous reception to what drummer Tom Coll – whose family used to say “skinty fia” and who named his small record label Skinty Recordings after the term – calls “the huge left turn” of ‘A Hero’s Death,’ gave the band license to be even bolder. Experiments on the album range from a sound-generating app to a random “Yeah,” which Chatten left in because he felt such unscripted moments made the record sound alive. The title track’s dancier rhythm came about after Coll had been channeling Roni Size and Goldie breakbeats. The song itself explores paranoia, anxiety, and the media as Chatten confronted the idea that, with their success, strangers are having conversations about him. The song is “an attempt not to care” but laced with delicious humour: I’m not inclined towards the scandalous word but on the subject of myself I do believe what I’ve heard.”

 

Perhaps the most traditional yet in a way most radical track on the album is “The Couple Across The Way,” the result of Chatten getting an accordion for Christmas and observing a rowing couple in the flat opposite, bound together in a destructive relationship. It is simply heartbreakingly beautiful, laden with killer lines such as “You use voices on the phone that were once spent on me.”

 

For all the musical and thematic disparity that lies between opener “In ár gCroíthe go deo” and the Conor Curley-penned closer “Nabokov,” in which Chatten sings about a submissive relationship, the songs all hang together, reflecting what Chatten describes as producer Dan Carey’s “understanding of them and how they relate to each other.” Although Carey was at the helm for a third time, this time the band relocated from what Chatten warmly describes as the “organised mess” of his tiny London studio to a larger studio in rural Oxfordshire. The bigger space allowed the songs to reach their potential in ways they perhaps wouldn’t have achieved in a smaller room.

 

The album’s bigger sound and reach should also see them consolidate and broaden their impact in the USA, where ‘A Hero’s Death’ reached No. 2 in the Heatseekers album chart, brought about the band’s second performance on The Tonight Show With Jimmy Fallon and saw them become only the second ever Irish band to win a Grammy nomination (for Best Rock Album).

 

‘Skinty Fia’ is very much a product of the people that made it, the Ireland they grew up in and the country left behind. Perhaps uncommonly in these times, it’s an album that begs to be listened to not a few tracks at a time but in full length sittings, as its rich, profound content reveals more with every listen.

 

“There’s a bravery about it and it’s just really expansive, musically and lyrically,” considers Chatten, fondly. “The songs have more scope and are fully-realised. You might say we’re all really proud of it.”

 

Little Feat – Waiting for Columbus Tour

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 To provide a safer environment for the public and significantly expedite fan entry into our venues, Rialto Theatre & 191 Toole have instituted a clear bag policy as of March 1st, 2022. The policy limits the size and type of bags that may be brought into our venues. The following is a list of bags that will be accepted for entry: Bags that are clear plastic or vinyl and do not exceed 12in x 6in x 12in One-gallon clear plastic freezer bags (Ziplok bag or similar) Small clutch bags, approximately 5in x 7in All bags subject to search. Clear bags are available for sale at the box office.

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THE INDOMITABLE LITTLE FEAT

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October 2021:  Having passed through ice—the Covid winter of the past eighteen months—Little Feat is ready to bring some fire.  They’ve announced their By Request tour for November 2021, and now they’ve added the Waiting for Columbus tour of March-April 2022.  Happy Feat, indeed.

Waiting for Columbus was Feat’s first live album, and it perfectly captures their consummate playing skill with extended versions of their early classic tunes.  Feat fans have been waiting for this tour for quite a while.

The tour stoppage caused by Covid could not obscure the joy and sparkle of their incredible body of work.  As their newest song, “When All Boats Rise,” puts it:

“When All Boats Rise we will find another pathway / When All Boats Rise we will shine like stars above / When All Boats Rise we can ride the silver skyway / That day is coming soon When All Boats Rise.”

We need that kind of optimistic faith, and Little Feat is ready to supply it.  Feat, do your stuff.

The members of Little Feat 2021 are:  Bill Payne, Keyboards and Vocals; Sam Clayton, Percussion and Vocals; Fred Tackett, Guitars and Vocals, Kenny Gradney, Bass; Scott Sharrard, Guitars and Vocals; and Tony Leone, drums.  Scott joined in 2019, Tony in 2020.  Lots more on them later, but for now….

 

Little Feat is very possibly the last-man-standing example of what used to be the norm in American music, a fusion of a broad span of styles and genres into something utterly distinctive.  They combined earthy, organic material with first-rate musicianship in a combination that transcends boundaries.  Feat took California rock, funk, folk, jazz, country, rockabilly, and New Orleans swamp boogie and more, stirred it into a rich gumbo, and has been leading people in joyful dance ever since.

 

It all began in 1969 when Frank Zappa was smart enough to fire Lowell George from the Mothers of Invention and tell him to go start a band of his own.  The late Paul Barrere, Feat’s long-time guitarist, wrote a few years back of how Lowell “came to the front door of the Laurel Canyon house I was livin’ in, with that beautiful white ‘p’ bass in hand, and asked if I wanted to try out as bass player for his new band. As most who know the story’s end can tell you, as a bassist I make an excellent guitarist…”

 

Actually, there were quite a number of bass players that first year—that seat took a while to fill.  George first settled on keyboard wizard Bill Payne, then added drummer Richie Hayward and bassist Roy Estrada (also a Zappa vet).  They were quickly signed by Warner Bros. and began working on the first of twelve albums with that venerable company.

 

The name was part of the legend.  A member of the Mothers happened to mention Lowell’s small feet to him “with an expletive,” said Paul Barrere.  “Lowell deleted the expletive, and the name was born with Feat instead of Feet, just like the Beatles.  Neat, huh?”

 

The first album, Little Feat, featured the instant-classic tune “Willin’,” and the follow-up Sailin’ Shoes added “Easy to Slip,” “Trouble,” “Tripe Face Boogie,” “Cold Cold Cold” and the title track to their repertoire, as well as a new version of “Willin’” that took it from pure Lowell to a fully-developed band tune.  Estrada departed, and the band signed up (on guitar!) Paul Barrere, Kenny Gradney (bass), and Sam Clayton (percussion), and the latter remain rock-solid members of Little Feat’s rhythm section.

 

1973’s Dixie Chicken gave them the title track and “Fat Man in the Bathtub,” as good a blues as any rock band has ever written.  The hits kept coming: the title track from Feats Don’t Fail Me Now (1974), which also gave us “Rock and Roll Doctor,” “Spanish Moon,” and “Oh, Atlanta,” another Southern-based winner (pretty good for a bunch of guys from L.A.!).  1975 saw The Last Record Album and “All That You Dream.”   In 1977, Time Loves a Hero delivered the classic title song, and their career to that point was summed up with the live Waiting for Columbus, truly one of the best live albums rock has ever heard.

 

Success is hard.  It cost Feat their founder, Lowell George, who in 1979 took a break from working on Down on the Farm to do some solo dates and was struck down by a heart attack.  And it cost the band,  temporarily, their joy; shortly after, they disbanded.

 

In 1986, Barrere and Payne met up in a chance jam session and found that they could still find that inspiration.  What they had written in ”Hangin’ On To The Good Times Here“— ”…although we went our own ways, we couldn’t escape from where we came, so we find ourselves back at the table again, telling stories of survivors and friends”—was of course true, as with any righteous song.  In 1988 they returned to the road, where they’ve been ever since (excepting the pandemic), joined by Craig Fuller on vocals and Fred Tackett on guitar.  Let It Roll re-introduced them to the world and was followed by Representing the Mambo and then Shake Me Up.  Craig left and Shaun Murphy joined in 1993; early in 2009 she departed the band.

 

Live from Neon Park—the name choice was a tribute to the album cover artist most often associated with Feat— was a two-CD set taken from shows at legendary venues like San Francisco’s Fillmore Auditorium and Portland (Oregon)’s Roseland Ballroom.  The studio albums Under The Radar and Chinese Work Songs added new favorite songs, especially “Calling The Children Home” and “Just Another Sunday,” along with creative covers of Dylan, The Band, and Phish songs.

 

In the early part of the new millennium, Feat started their own Hot Tomato Records and began to share their rich archives with their fans, producing the double CD collections of rarities Raw Tomatos and Ripe Tomatos from both fan and band tapes.  2002 also yielded Live From the Ram’s Head, a two-CD acoustic show, and in ’03 came Down Upon the Suwannee, a live show recorded on the banks of the river at the Magnolia Festival in northern Florida.  Hot Tomato also gave the musicians the freedom to deliver solo work, as well, first with Fred Tackett’s In A Town Like This, and then Bill Payne’s Cielo Norte, an intimate, lyrical marriage of keyboards.

 

Their studio album from 2003 was Kickin’ It At The Barn, produced by Paul Barrere, Bill Payne, and Fred Tackett. It’s named after the place it was recorded, Tackett’s barn-cum-studio in Topanga Canyon, which lent an invaluable ambience to the undertaking. In his liner notes, faithful Feat member Paul Barrere wrote, ”If music is a conversation between the players, then we are talking like never before…this has been truly one of the most memorable recording projects we’ve done. We started with an idea to write songs on acoustic guitar and piano, like the old days before computers and samples, and then let the band interpret the music.“

 

Little Feat’s rich legacy was acknowledged at the 25th anniversary of the monumental live album Waiting for Columbus when Rhino Records put out a special two CD edition of the original concert, plus outtakes, along with Hotcakes and Outtakes:  30 Years of Little Feat, a four-CD, 83 track boxed set featuring hits from all of Feat’s albums as well as alternate takes and rarities from a rich past, which has included playing with everybody from Bob Dylan to Beck, Willie Nelson to Bonnie Raitt, Robert Plant, John Lee Hooker, and…you name it.

 

Join the Band, in many ways a summing up of all that’s preceded it, came in 2009, with re-recordings of their classic songs bringing together a vast slew of musical friends on vocals backed by Feat—Dave Matthews on “Fat Man,” Jimmy Buffett on “Champion of the World,” Emmylou Harris on “Sailin’ Shoes.”  Bill Payne said it was about locating their influences.  In some ways, it documents the way they’ve influenced the musicians who listen to them.  And it certainly documents a musical career.

 

Their latest studio work is Rooster Rag, by critical consensus their best studio album in twenty years, featuring four songs co-written by Payne and the Grateful Dead’s legendary lyricist Robert Hunter, four breakout songs by Fred Tackett, and a superb collaboration between Paul Barrere and the late Stephen Bruton.

 

If you play long enough—and Little Feat has—you have to face everything.  Richie Hayward, the sterling drummer who’d held down the beat for nearly forty years, was finally taken down by liver cancer in 2010.  The same grim pursuer caught up with Paul Barrere in 2019.  Paul will always be missed, yet paradoxically his absence also confirmed the stunning power of the music that Little Feat has made for so very long.

 

Paul’s health was precarious, and so the band needed a substitute for the last two shows in a three-week run in October, 2019, with Larry Campbell and Teresa Williams.  They found their sub in Scott Sharrard, a frequent sit-in with Bill Payne’s other band, the Doobie Brothers. Scott is best known for his role as guitarist and musical director with the late Gregg Allman, but he’s had a long and successful career in addition to that.  Born in Michigan in 1976 on the day his hero Freddie King died, he came up in the bar band culture of Milwaukee in the ‘90s, where on a given night you could hear Buddy Miles, Hubert Sumlin, Luther Allison, and Clyde Stubblefield.  Soon he was catching on with dates in Chicago, where he jammed with two legendary Muddy Waters sidemen, drummer Willie “Big Eyes” Smith and pianist Pinetop Perkins.

 

Scott’s band The Chesterfields put out three albums and toured nationally, and then he went out on his own, releasing Dawnbreaker (2005), Analog/Monolog (2008), Ante Up (2009), and most recently, Saving Grace, recorded in Muscle Shoals at FAME studio with members of the legendary Swampers and Bernard “Pretty” Purdie.

 

His time with Gregg Allman was rich, peaking when they co-wrote “My Only True Friend” for Gregg’s last solo album, Southern Blood.  The song earned a Grammy nomination for Americana Song of the Year.

 

His relationship with Little Feat goes surprisingly far back.  At the age of 12 he stayed up late to watch Feat play “Let It Roll” on “Saturday Night Live, what he called “one of my big bang moments.”  He went on, “I grew up with the lifestyle of the way Little Feat music was crafted and Lowell George was a key influence of mine.  I was an overweight, Midwestern middle class white kid and when I heard Lowell sing and play—he kind of proved to me what might be possible for who I was.  It was that deep for me as a kid.”

 

So when he got a call from Bill Payne in the fall of 2019 to fill in for Paul on two gigs (Long Island and Pennsylvania), “I took it as seriously as a heart attack.  See, the Doobie Brothers guys have been big supporters of mine and when Gregg Allman passed they adopted (Gregg Allman Band percussionist) Marc Quiñones and our road manager Vid Sutherland  and a bunch of other people.  So when Bill was looking for someone, he was on tour with the Doobies and everyone was like Scott Sharrard.  And Bill had played with me—I’d sat in with the Doobies dozens of times, just playing guitar, but I never sang with them.  So his concern was that, checking out my vocals.”

 

“I got the catalogue together, came to do the first gig.  It was on Long Island, and I had never met Kenny, Sam or Fred before.  I knew the horns because one of them, Jay Collins, was with Gregg Allman and the other guys I knew from when I used to work at Levon Helm’s Studio. And as I was checking out my rig and getting to meet the crew, the word came that Paul had passed away.   When I met Kenny and Fred and Sam for the first time, the first thing I had to do was give my condolences.  And then the announcement of his passing was the first thing that happened when I went on stage with Little Feat to hit the first note with them.  The fans didn’t even know he passed away.”

 

“Those two gigs became kind of a very spiritual moment for the band, and I just brought whatever I had to the table as a fan first and then as a musician and it worked, it just worked.  I haven’t had a lot of coincidences in my life and this was definitely one of the more powerful spaces I’ve ever been in where I feel like I was in the right place at the right time for the right reasons.”

 

Tony Leone was announced as the new drummer during the pandemic.  Best known for his 2002 collaboration with Amy Helm, Olabelle, his work in the Chris Robinson Band, Phil Lesh and Friends, and as a member of Levon Helm’s Midnight Ramble Band, Tony actually moved through Little Feat orbits several times over the years.  Paul and Fred played on Levon’s Ramble show, which led to the Midnight Ramble Band playing with Feat in Jamaica at least four times.  Tony was also twice a member of Anders Osborne’s Jazzfest spinoff band Dead Feat.

 

Tony recalled “fanboying” out on Richie when they first met, and assuming his seat is an honor he takes seriously.  “I can honestly say that almost every time I sit down behind the drums, there are a few guys that I always think of.  One of them is Levon Helm. And another one is Richie Hayward.  The thing that both of them had in common was their feel.  It wasn’t necessarily their pyrotechnical abilities to astound the audience with their virtuosity or anything like that. It was like, no, when they sat down to play a song, immediately that thing had a groove that made the music dance, and made the people want to dance…The first tune I remember hearing that I knew it was Levon was “Up on Cripple Creek” and then the first Little Feat tune that I remember hearing was “Dixie Chicken” and they’ve both got that swampy backbeat shuffle thing going on.”

 

“Whenever I’m going to play those tunes, I’m always going to consult what Richie played first and I’m always going to try to play those parts with integrity.  And not to be a clone, but to try and give them a certain feel that he had.”

 

You can go a number of ways when you spend your life on the road.  You can get eaten up by the stresses and quit, or you can hold on to your music and your friends and the joy of the people out front and keep the priorities straight the way the Featsters have.

 

Fifty years on, they’ve been up and they’ve been down and they know where they belong—standing or sitting behind their instruments, playing for you.  And anything’s possible, because the end is not in sight.

 

ABOUT NICKI BLUHM

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A San Franciscan now calling Tennessee home, Nicki Bluhm possesses a modern, clear-eyed perspective that grabs the heart and keeps you holding on to every word.

 

Bluhm’s music career began in the Cow Hollow area of San Francisco, where she recorded two solo albums and co-founded Nicki Bluhm and The Gramblers. The band wrote and performed their own music and recorded covers nostalgic to their childhoods, including their viral YouTube hit, the Hall and Oates classic “I Can’t Go For That.”

 

In 2017, Bluhm made the decision to leave California to forge a career as a solo artist in Nashville. Her ensuing solo album, To Rise You Gotta Fall (2018), plumbed the depths of hard goodbyes and hopeful beginnings.

 

Releasing in June of 2022, her new album Avondale Drive is a masterful exploration of what it means to be fully yourself, rather than a vessel for the expectations of others. “This album is a lot about building trust back in myself. Finding my own inner compass and aligning it to my authentic self,” she says.

 

Recorded in East Nashville with producer Jesse Noah Wilson, and featuring Oliver Wood, Erin Rae, A.J. Croce, Jay Bellerose, and others, Avondale Drive combines nostalgic country-rock with distinctly modern, sharp lyricism—an apt contrast for the process of studying one’s past in order to make a better future.

 

“Writing songs is often a way for me to talk myself down when my ruminating mind won’t stop,” Bluhm says, “I have to remind myself that it’s important to sit with hard feelings, to know what I’m in control of and more importantly of what I’m not. To learn how to be comfortable within the discomfort. The songs I tend to write are typically what become the mantras I need to hear most.”

 

Highlight tracks include “Friends,” a duet with Oliver Wood, “Love to Spare,” which Bluhm co-wrote with songwriter A.J. Croce, and “Learn to Love Myself,” about the self-reflection that comes when you don’t have a person around to distract you from your own flaws.

 

Avondale Drive is reminiscent of the beginnings and endings described in Bluhm’s previous album, but there is a distinctly new, mature perspective. Says Bluhm, “At the end of a relationship, sometimes the truth is the only scrap of kindness we have left to offer. [It all] goes back to the overarching theme of trusting yourself, trusting the universe and trusting it’ll all work out as it should. Calling off the war with what IS.”

 

Following appearances and collaborations with artists such as Phil Lesh, Dawes, The Band of Heathens, Little Feat, and The Infamous Stringdusters, Bluhm’s creative confidence is well-won, and her authentic voice and songwriting is all the more apparent on Avondale Drive.