The Rialto Theatre Presents...

Josh Rouse @ 191 Toole w/ Freddy Parish

Tuesday, May 3
Show: 8:00pm

Price: $20-$23 + Taxes and Fees

Not On Sale

ABOUT Josh Rouse

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“Like a baseball player who quietly hits 30 home runs every year or a golfer who regularly finishes in the Top Ten, Josh Rouse‘s continued streak of excellence is easy to ignore and maybe even downplay a little” — Tim Sendra, Allmusic.com

 

You don’t have to work hard to enjoy Rouse’s music. His songs present themselves to you with an open heart, an innate intelligence and an absolute lack of pretension. They are clear-eyed, empathetic and penetrating. Without pandering, they seek to satisfy both your ear and your understanding. The verses draw you in with telling detail, both musical and thematic, and the choruses lift and deliver. They resolve without seeming overly tidy or pat.

 

Josh Rouse was born in Nebraska, and following an itinerant upbringing he eventually landed in Nashville where he recorded his debut Dressed Like Nebraska (1998).  The album’s acclaim led to tours with Aimee Mann, Mark Etzel and the late Vic Chestnut. The followup- Home (2000)—yielded the song “Directions” which Cameron Crowe used in his film Vanilla Sky.

 

“Every time I’ve made a record, I’ve tried to make it different from the last one,” says Rouse. “I always became fascinated by a different style of music. But at the end of the day, no matter how eclectic I try to make it, it’s my voice and melodic sensibility that tie things together.”

For his breakthrough album, 1972 (2003), which happens to be the year he was born, Rouse decided to cheer up a bit. Noting that he’d earned a reputation for melancholy, he says, with a laugh, “I figured this is my career, I might as well try to enjoy it.” While the Seventies are often identified with singer-songwriters, Rouse was primarily attracted to the warmer sound of albums back then, as well as the more communal feel of the soul music of that time.  The follow up,  Nashville (2005) continued the hot streak and expanded his audience further.

 

After relocating to  Valencia, Spain with his wife Paz, Rouse has released a steady stream of high quality songs and albums. Subtitulo (2006) contained the international indie folk hit “Quiet Town”. On El Turista (2010) he even experimented with writing and singing some  songs in Spanish. In  2014, he won a Goya Award (the Spanish equivalent of an Oscar) for best song for “Do You Really Want To Be In Love,” from the film ‘La Gran Familia Española.’

 

The Embers of Time, was one of his strongest—self-described as “my surreal, ex-pat, therapy record.”  He followed that up with Love In the Modern Age, which took its musical inspiration from the thinking man’s pop of the eighties: The Blue Nile, Prefab Sprout and the Style Council. And in 2019 he tackled the Christmas album on The Holiday Sounds of Josh Rouse but instead of well-worn carols or classics, he wrote an entire record of original holiday themed pop songs.

 

ABOUT Freddy Parish

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Freddy Parish grew up in Sonoma County, California, just down the road from where Jack London wrote “Valley of the Moon,” named for the mythic translation of the Miwok “Sonoma.” His Arkansas born father inspired a lifelong love of country music, from the poetry of John Prine, to the gentle love songs of Don Williams. After spending a year of high school studying abroad on the Baltic Coast in Ainazi, Latvia, he went on to spend his formative years traveling the country taking odd jobs and writing songs, and later returned to school to study Music Composition, Audio Production, and Poetry at the Evergreen State College in Washington.

After spending time in North Carolina, Virginia and West Virginia, Freddy began tracing back the roots of country music, along with his own Ozark family heritage, in a study of old time fiddle and banjo traditions. In 2018 he won 1st place for old time banjo at the West Virginia Open Fiddle and Banjo Contest. Upon settling in the Southwestern border town of Tucson, Arizona, he founded the Old Town String Band, who in 2018 released a collection of traditional songs and tunes entitled “Last Chance.” The group established a monthly residency to showcase old time and traditional country music at Tucson’s now shuttered listening room El Crisol. In 2021 he released an EP of original songs entitled “A Cold July” and has taken up a monthly residency at the iconic Hotel Congress in downtown Tucson.  He has opened for Marty Stuart, Sam Outlaw, Jade Jackson, and Run Boy Run.

Freddy continues to pursue his own more contemporary songwriting in the Country, Roots, and Americana genres through story telling, poetic imagery, and themes of heartache and love, existentialist dread and hope, courage, vulnerability, and the ever beckoning open road.

The Rialto Theatre Foundation is a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization dedicated to the stewardship and preservation of the historic Rialto Theatre, a unique entertainment venue and cornerstone of downtown Tucson, offering a broad range of high-quality performing arts that are reflective of the diverse and vibrant community it serves.

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Clear Bag Policy

Rialto Theatre & 191 Toole Switch to a clear bag policy as of 3/1/22 – February 2022

To provide a safer environment for the public and significantly expedite fan entry into our venues, Rialto Theatre & 191 Toole will be instituting a clear bag policy on March 1st, 2022.

The policy limits the size and type of bags that may be brought into our venues. The following is a list of bags that will be accepted for entry:

  • Bags that are clear plastic or vinyl and do not exceed 12” x 6” x 12”
  • One-gallon clear plastic freezer bags (Ziploc bag or similar)
  • Small clutch bags, approximately 5” x 7”

*All bags subject to search.
**Clear bags are available for sale at the box office.

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Para ofrecer un entorno más seguro a los invitados y agilizar la entrada a nuestros edificios, el Rialto Theatre & 191 Toole comenzará a aplicar una norma sobre bolsas transparentes el 1 de marzo de 2022.


La norma limita el tamaño y el tipo de bolsas que pueden introducirse en nuestros edificios. La siguiente es una lista de bolsas que serán aceptadas para la entrada:

  • Bolsas de plástico transparente o de vinilo que no superen las 12″ x 6″ x 12″.
  • Bolsas de plástico transparente para congelar de un galón (bolsa Ziploc o similar)
  • Bolsas pequeñas tipo clutch, de aproximadamente 5″ x 7″.

*Todas las bolsas están sujetas a registro.
**Las bolsas transparentes están a la venta en la taquilla.